Bill Clinton lost his voice cheering for World Cup

Bill Clinton cheered so much at yesterday’s World Cup game between the United States and Algeria that he lost his voice. He told the Associated Press today: “I lost my voice yesterday. I had to come home and drink hot tea with honey for an hour.… I was very diplomatic until we scored, and then ...

Photos: Jeff Mitchell - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images
Photos: Jeff Mitchell - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images
Photos: Jeff Mitchell - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images

Bill Clinton cheered so much at yesterday's World Cup game between the United States and Algeria that he lost his voice. He told the Associated Press today:

"I lost my voice yesterday. I had to come home and drink hot tea with honey for an hour.… I was very diplomatic until we scored, and then I was up there screaming and yelling with everybody."

After the game, Clinton -- who is honorary chairman of the USA Bid Committee that is trying to bring the World Cup to the United States in 2018 or 2022 -- spent about an hour in the locker room, celebrating with the U.S. soccer team, as seen in the photos at left. He even had enough of his voice remaining at that point to give a little speech, reports Yahoo! Sports. According to players and officials, he said:

Bill Clinton cheered so much at yesterday’s World Cup game between the United States and Algeria that he lost his voice. He told the Associated Press today:

“I lost my voice yesterday. I had to come home and drink hot tea with honey for an hour.… I was very diplomatic until we scored, and then I was up there screaming and yelling with everybody.”

After the game, Clinton — who is honorary chairman of the USA Bid Committee that is trying to bring the World Cup to the United States in 2018 or 2022 — spent about an hour in the locker room, celebrating with the U.S. soccer team, as seen in the photos at left. He even had enough of his voice remaining at that point to give a little speech, reports Yahoo! Sports. According to players and officials, he said:

“As someone who cares about our country, you made me proud to be an American.”

Clinton, who was president when the United States hosted the World Cup in 1994 and women’s World Cup in 1999, was in Africa primarily to lobby FIFA’s executive committee on the U.S. bid for 2018 or 2022, though his trip includes visits to Malawi and Tanzania to check up on Clinton Foundation projects. Clinton is so enthused by yesterday’s U.S. win he has changed his schedule so he can attend Saturday’s U.S.-Ghana match.

(In the top photo, Clinton shakes hands with Steve Cherundolo. In the bottom photo, he poses with the team.)

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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