Live: Who’s to blame for failed states?

Live TV : Ustream The 2010 Foreign Policy/The Fund for Peace Failed States Index came out this month and once again Somalia tops the list for the third year in a row. Why be polite about it? Failed states are a disaster – for the people who live in them and for the international community ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.

Live TV : Ustream

The 2010 Foreign Policy/The Fund for Peace Failed States Index came out this month and once again Somalia tops the list for the third year in a row. Why be polite about it? Failed states are a disaster – for the people who live in them and for the international community that struggles to figure out what to do about them. So let’s cast some blame, point some fingers, and name some names. We’ll start with the dictators and tyrants who rule them, the international organizations who coddle them, and the other countries, regimes and superpowers who support them. As James Traub says in the July/August issue of Foreign Policy magazine, the US has long struggled to come up with a policy towards failed states, and he quotes Secretary Gates in saying that “dealing with such fractured or failing states is, in many ways, the main security challenge of our times.”

Please join the New America Foundation’s American Strategy Program, Foreign Policy magazine, and The Fund for Peace in co-hosting this sure-to-be lively conversation with the participants below.

Participants

Panelists
James Traub
Contributing Writer, New York Times Magazine
"Terms of Engagement" Writer, Foreign Policy.com

Pauline H. Baker
President
The Fund for Peace

Steven Clemons
Director, American Strategy Program
New America Foundation
Publisher, The Washington Note

Moderator
Susan Glasser
Editor in Chief
Foreign Policy Magazine

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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