Entire Maldives cabinet quits in protest

The cabinet of the Maldives sure has a flair for the dramatic. If you’ll recall, this is the same bunch that held a meeting underwater last year to draw attention to the country’s sinking land mass. But will the administrative body’s latest stunt be its last? In one fell swoop, all of the Maldives’ 13 ...

350.org / Flickr.com
350.org / Flickr.com
350.org / Flickr.com

The cabinet of the Maldives sure has a flair for the dramatic. If you'll recall, this is the same bunch that held a meeting underwater last year to draw attention to the country's sinking land mass. But will the administrative body's latest stunt be its last?

In one fell swoop, all of the Maldives' 13 cabinet members quit their jobs this week, accusing opposition lawmakers of blocking President Mohamed Nasheed's reform initiatives:

"Opposition MPs (members of parliament) are obstructing the business of government [...]" a statement posted on the Website of Nasheed's office quoted finance minister Ali Hashim as saying on the day the cabinet quit.

The cabinet of the Maldives sure has a flair for the dramatic. If you’ll recall, this is the same bunch that held a meeting underwater last year to draw attention to the country’s sinking land mass. But will the administrative body’s latest stunt be its last?

In one fell swoop, all of the Maldives’ 13 cabinet members quit their jobs this week, accusing opposition lawmakers of blocking President Mohamed Nasheed’s reform initiatives:

"Opposition MPs (members of parliament) are obstructing the business of government […]" a statement posted on the Website of Nasheed’s office quoted finance minister Ali Hashim as saying on the day the cabinet quit.

What more can we expect from the (now retired) ministers? Considering their penchant for coordinated action, maybe they’ll try their hands at something like group skydiving, or synchronized swimming. They’ve also got just the right number of players to form a rugby league team.

Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.

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