Introducing the Middle East Channel’s Daily News Brief

The Middle East Channel has established itself as a daily must-read for those interested in the politics and culture of the region. Since its launch in March, the Channel has brought you more than 100 pieces of fresh commentary from some of the leading experts on the region. Now we are pleased to announce its latest ...

AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images

The Middle East Channel has established itself as a daily must-read for those interested in the politics and culture of the region. Since its launch in March, the Channel has brought you more than 100 pieces of fresh commentary from some of the leading experts on the region. Now we are pleased to announce its latest expansion: the Middle East Channel's Daily News Brief. 

The Channel's news brief will provide you with not only a concise offering of the day's top news items on the Middle East, but also the latest reports, speeches, blog posts and quality analysis being produced every day. You don't need to go looking for it -- we'll deliver it to your inbox every morning by 9a.m. We'll even throw in a daily snapshot from the Middle East. We'll also be including links to the latest posts from the Middle East Channel, so if you've enjoyed the pieces the Channel has been posting, the daily brief will make sure you never miss a post. 

The brief will pay special attention to the wide variety of regional and international sources, publications and outlets outside the Beltway echo chamber to give you access to a fuller spectrum of the debates surrounding the politics and culture of the Middle East. We hope that you'll enjoy this latest service -- and encourage you to send comments, questions and suggestions to mideastchannel@foreignpolicy.com

The Middle East Channel has established itself as a daily must-read for those interested in the politics and culture of the region. Since its launch in March, the Channel has brought you more than 100 pieces of fresh commentary from some of the leading experts on the region. Now we are pleased to announce its latest expansion: the Middle East Channel’s Daily News Brief. 

The Channel’s news brief will provide you with not only a concise offering of the day’s top news items on the Middle East, but also the latest reports, speeches, blog posts and quality analysis being produced every day. You don’t need to go looking for it — we’ll deliver it to your inbox every morning by 9a.m. We’ll even throw in a daily snapshot from the Middle East. We’ll also be including links to the latest posts from the Middle East Channel, so if you’ve enjoyed the pieces the Channel has been posting, the daily brief will make sure you never miss a post. 

The brief will pay special attention to the wide variety of regional and international sources, publications and outlets outside the Beltway echo chamber to give you access to a fuller spectrum of the debates surrounding the politics and culture of the Middle East. We hope that you’ll enjoy this latest service — and encourage you to send comments, questions and suggestions to mideastchannel@foreignpolicy.com

With the launch of our news brief, it is our hope that the Middle East Channel can better serve all of us who are interested in the region, and want to better engage with its issues. 

The brief will go live starting July 7, 2010. If you’re interested in signing up, please click here.

UPDATE: Today’s brief can be found here.

Maria Kornalian is the executive associate for the Project on Middle East Political Science and an assistant editor for the Middle East Channel.

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