New store lets angry Chinese women smash things

Face it — nothing’s more satisfying when you’re angry than taking a whack at large, breakable objects. Problem is, smashing your own property to bits carries some pretty disappointing consequences, like having to clean up the mess — or, in extreme cases, having to replace the goods you just destroyed. Luckily, a new shop in ...

People's Daily Online
People's Daily Online
People's Daily Online

Face it -- nothing's more satisfying when you're angry than taking a whack at large, breakable objects. Problem is, smashing your own property to bits carries some pretty disappointing consequences, like having to clean up the mess -- or, in extreme cases, having to replace the goods you just destroyed.

Luckily, a new shop in China will let you vent your frustrations on other people's equipment without dealing so much as a scratch to your own. After paying for the right to abuse an old TV, mobile phone, plate, chair or other item -- yes, the Pottery Barn rule still applies -- you have up to one minute to unleash your wrath upon your target. As an additional bonus, the store makes motorcycle helmets and gloves available to prevent injuries. But there's a catch: if you're not a woman, you can't play. Looks like frustrated men will have to stick with the ol' pillow standby for now.

Hat tip: Shanghaiist

Face it — nothing’s more satisfying when you’re angry than taking a whack at large, breakable objects. Problem is, smashing your own property to bits carries some pretty disappointing consequences, like having to clean up the mess — or, in extreme cases, having to replace the goods you just destroyed.

Luckily, a new shop in China will let you vent your frustrations on other people’s equipment without dealing so much as a scratch to your own. After paying for the right to abuse an old TV, mobile phone, plate, chair or other item — yes, the Pottery Barn rule still applies — you have up to one minute to unleash your wrath upon your target. As an additional bonus, the store makes motorcycle helmets and gloves available to prevent injuries. But there’s a catch: if you’re not a woman, you can’t play. Looks like frustrated men will have to stick with the ol’ pillow standby for now.

Hat tip: Shanghaiist

Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.