British MP: I was too drunk to vote

The amazingly named MP from Kent, Mark Reckless, has apologized to his contituents for missing a vote on the country’s budget because he had gotten, like, totally wasted with his colleagues at Westminster:  Mr Reckless denied claims that he fell asleep on the terrace or got a taxi back to his constituency. He added: “I ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
567123_100712_reckless2.jpg
567123_100712_reckless2.jpg

The amazingly named MP from Kent, Mark Reckless, has apologized to his contituents for missing a vote on the country's budget because he had gotten, like, totally wasted with his colleagues at Westminster: 

Mr Reckless denied claims that he fell asleep on the terrace or got a taxi back to his constituency.

He added: "I remember someone asking me to vote and not thinking it was appropriate, given how I was at the time. If I was in the sort of situation generally where I thought I was drunk I tend to go home. Westminster is a very special situation and all I can say... is given this very embarrassing experience I don't intend to drink at Westminster again."

The amazingly named MP from Kent, Mark Reckless, has apologized to his contituents for missing a vote on the country’s budget because he had gotten, like, totally wasted with his colleagues at Westminster: 

Mr Reckless denied claims that he fell asleep on the terrace or got a taxi back to his constituency.

He added: “I remember someone asking me to vote and not thinking it was appropriate, given how I was at the time. If I was in the sort of situation generally where I thought I was drunk I tend to go home. Westminster is a very special situation and all I can say… is given this very embarrassing experience I don’t intend to drink at Westminster again.”

Mr Reckless was having drinks on the night of the second reading of the Finance Bill, which lasted until 0230 BST on Wednesday.

I don’t mean to endorse voting while intoxicated, but presumably Reckless already knew how he was voting on his own party’s finance bill so he must been pretty rough shape if he didn’t even think he could raise his hand at the right time. 

I’m guessing turning Westminster into a frat house wasn’t quite what Prime Minister Cameron had in mind for his “responsibility agenda.”

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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