Clinton offers condolences on 15th anniversary of Srebrenica massacre

Yesterday, on the 15th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre (recounted in the recent FP photo essay, "The Shadows of Srebrenica"), Secretary Clinton offered her condolences and said, "We are duty-bound — to the victims, to their surviving family members, and to future generations — to prevent such atrocities from happening again." Her complete statement: Today ...

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images
DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images
DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday, on the 15th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre (recounted in the recent FP photo essay, "The Shadows of Srebrenica"), Secretary Clinton offered her condolences and said, "We are duty-bound -- to the victims, to their surviving family members, and to future generations -- to prevent such atrocities from happening again." Her complete statement:

Today we remember the tragic events in Srebrenica 15 years ago. I join President Obama and the people of the United States in offering our deepest condolences on this most solemn occasion. We honor the memories of the victims and mourn with their families.

The United States stands with Bosnia and Herzegovina, and all countries in the region who wish to foster peace and reconciliation. We remain committed to ensuring that those responsible for these crimes face justice. We recognize that there can be no lasting peace without justice. It is only by bringing all responsible parties to account for their crimes that we will truly honor Srebrenica's victims.

Yesterday, on the 15th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre (recounted in the recent FP photo essay, "The Shadows of Srebrenica"), Secretary Clinton offered her condolences and said, "We are duty-bound — to the victims, to their surviving family members, and to future generations — to prevent such atrocities from happening again." Her complete statement:

Today we remember the tragic events in Srebrenica 15 years ago. I join President Obama and the people of the United States in offering our deepest condolences on this most solemn occasion. We honor the memories of the victims and mourn with their families.

The United States stands with Bosnia and Herzegovina, and all countries in the region who wish to foster peace and reconciliation. We remain committed to ensuring that those responsible for these crimes face justice. We recognize that there can be no lasting peace without justice. It is only by bringing all responsible parties to account for their crimes that we will truly honor Srebrenica’s victims.

We are duty-bound – to the victims, to their surviving family members, and to future generations – to prevent such atrocities from happening again. Our common faith in the value of freedom and peace unifies us and drives us to act. That is why we are committed to working with all the communities that make up Bosnia and Herzegovina to move forward and build a pluralistic, democratic state that can take its rightful place in the Euro-Atlantic community. A prosperous, free, and unified Bosnia and Herzegovina is the most worthy monument to those who lost their lives at Srebrenica and the best guarantee against such a tragedy ever repeating itself.

In the photo above, taken July 10, a Bosnian woman mourns over green-covered coffins of  recently identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. In a ceremony yesterday to mark the 15th anniversary of the tragedy, 775 recently identified bodies were buried at the Potocari cemetery near Srebrenica.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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