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Mahmoud Abbas campaigning for Nobel Peace Prize?

Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, is hoping to join the ranks of Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin in his quest to win a Nobel Peace Prize.  Taking the unusual step of actively campaigning for the award, Abbas has reportedly sent mediators to persuade the committee to award him the honor and seems ...

Thaer Ganaim/PPO/Getty Images
Thaer Ganaim/PPO/Getty Images

Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, is hoping to join the ranks of Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin in his quest to win a Nobel Peace Prize. 

Taking the unusual step of actively campaigning for the award, Abbas has reportedly sent mediators to persuade the committee to award him the honor and seems to be circumventing the most direct (and much harder) route toward the prize -- creating peace. Most Nobel Peace Prize winners have distinguished themselves by negotiating cease-fires, ending wars or apartheid -- or, in the case of President Obama "for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."

Presumably, the best chance for Abbas to win the Nobel Peace Prize is to create peace with Israel. But there's one question left -- will Bibi Netanyahu want one, too?

Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, is hoping to join the ranks of Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin in his quest to win a Nobel Peace Prize. 

Taking the unusual step of actively campaigning for the award, Abbas has reportedly sent mediators to persuade the committee to award him the honor and seems to be circumventing the most direct (and much harder) route toward the prize — creating peace. Most Nobel Peace Prize winners have distinguished themselves by negotiating cease-fires, ending wars or apartheid — or, in the case of President Obama "for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."

Presumably, the best chance for Abbas to win the Nobel Peace Prize is to create peace with Israel. But there’s one question left — will Bibi Netanyahu want one, too?

Jennifer Parker is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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