Can Hindu gods invest in the stock market?

A court case in India might could give a whole new meaning to the phrase “masters of the universe”:  Can Hindu deities have demat accounts to enable them transact in shares and debentures on the stock market? The Bombay High Court will decide the issue after a religious trust filed a petition challenging the decision ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
567111_100712_LordGanesh2.jpg
567111_100712_LordGanesh2.jpg

A court case in India might could give a whole new meaning to the phrase "masters of the universe": 

Can Hindu deities have demat accounts to enable them transact in shares and debentures on the stock market?

The Bombay High Court will decide the issue after a religious trust filed a petition challenging the decision of National Securities Depository Ltd (NSDL) to refuse it permission for opening demat accounts in the names of five Hindu deities.

A court case in India might could give a whole new meaning to the phrase “masters of the universe”: 

Can Hindu deities have demat accounts to enable them transact in shares and debentures on the stock market?

The Bombay High Court will decide the issue after a religious trust filed a petition challenging the decision of National Securities Depository Ltd (NSDL) to refuse it permission for opening demat accounts in the names of five Hindu deities.

The deities of the Sangli-based trust “Ganpati Panchayatam Sansthan” are Lord Ganesh, Chintamaneshwardev, Chintamaneshwaridevi, Suryanarayandev and Laxminarayandev. The trust, belonging to the Patwardhan family, the erstwhile royals of Sangli, had obtained PAN cards in the names of deities in 2008. 

In Inida, a “demat account” is one in which shares are held in electronic form rather than in certificates, which seems appropriate for metaphysical beings. If Lord Ganesh and co. do win their case, I know the perfect banker for them. 

Hat tip: Marginal Revolution

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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