Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

Army suffered a suicide a day last month

I keep on saying that the Army may not break this time the way it did last time, in the 1970s. I don’t know if a suicide a day is an indicator of a breaking force, but it sure does indicate an extraordinary sustained level of stress.

Lance Cheung/flickr
Lance Cheung/flickr

I keep on saying that the Army may not break this time the way it did last time, in the 1970s. I don't know if a suicide a day is an indicator of a breaking force, but it sure does indicate an extraordinary sustained level of stress.

I keep on saying that the Army may not break this time the way it did last time, in the 1970s. I don’t know if a suicide a day is an indicator of a breaking force, but it sure does indicate an extraordinary sustained level of stress.

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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