Are your tax dollars paying for Putin’s pecs?

Here at FP, we’re certainly not above a bit of Putin-sploitation now and then. But I’m not quite sure what message Nevada senate candidate Sharon Angle is trying to send with this new commercial, which seems to spend an inordinate amount of time ogling the prime minister’s bare chest:  No, Harry Reid isn’t forcing flabby ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.

Here at FP, we're certainly not above a bit of Putin-sploitation now and then. But I'm not quite sure what message Nevada senate candidate Sharon Angle is trying to send with this new commercial, which seems to spend an inordinate amount of time ogling the prime minister's bare chest: 

Here at FP, we’re certainly not above a bit of Putin-sploitation now and then. But I’m not quite sure what message Nevada senate candidate Sharon Angle is trying to send with this new commercial, which seems to spend an inordinate amount of time ogling the prime minister’s bare chest: 

No, Harry Reid isn’t forcing flabby Nevadans to enroll in a "get a body like Putin’s" weight loss program.  The ad is referring to John McCain and Tom Coburn’s new list of "100 Stimulus Projects that Give Taxpayers the Blues.” One of these is a $200,000 grant to a U.S. environmental NGO to help indigenous Siberian communities lobby the Russian government. Perhaps the stimulus bill isn’t the most appropriate place to fund such a project, but it doesn’t seem like the most ridiculous goal in the world. I suspect it made it on the list because anything involving Siberia, like anything involving animals, just sounds silly.

Still not sure what it has to do with Putin’s pecs though.    

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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