Clinton congratulates Ecuadoreans on anniversary of ‘First Cry of Independence’

Secretary Clinton marked the 201st anniversary of Ecuador’s "first cry of independence ("Primer Grito de la Independencia") — which occurred in Quito on Aug. 10, 1809 — by issuing the following statement yesterday: On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Ecuador on the 201st anniversary ...

RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images
RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images
RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Clinton marked the 201st anniversary of Ecuador's "first cry of independence ("Primer Grito de la Independencia") -- which occurred in Quito on Aug. 10, 1809 -- by issuing the following statement yesterday:

On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Ecuador on the 201st anniversary of your country's call for independence on August 10.

On my recent visit to your historic capital, I was honored to experience the hospitality and warmth of the Ecuadorian people first hand. Cooperation between Ecuador and the United States on issues of mutual concern - from combating narco-trafficking to reducing poverty - has strengthened our partnership and reaffirmed the underlying values that unite our two countries. These ties are further enhanced by the exchange of people and ideas through cultural initiatives. The United States stands ready to build on this relationship and seize the opportunity to consolidate our democratic values, cooperate to address regional and global challenges, and use our interdependence to enhance prosperity and expand opportunity throughout the hemisphere.

Secretary Clinton marked the 201st anniversary of Ecuador’s "first cry of independence ("Primer Grito de la Independencia") — which occurred in Quito on Aug. 10, 1809 — by issuing the following statement yesterday:

On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Ecuador on the 201st anniversary of your country’s call for independence on August 10.

On my recent visit to your historic capital, I was honored to experience the hospitality and warmth of the Ecuadorian people first hand. Cooperation between Ecuador and the United States on issues of mutual concern – from combating narco-trafficking to reducing poverty – has strengthened our partnership and reaffirmed the underlying values that unite our two countries. These ties are further enhanced by the exchange of people and ideas through cultural initiatives. The United States stands ready to build on this relationship and seize the opportunity to consolidate our democratic values, cooperate to address regional and global challenges, and use our interdependence to enhance prosperity and expand opportunity throughout the hemisphere.

I wish all Ecuadorians a safe and happy celebration on the anniversary of your "first cry of independence." We look forward to working together as partners in creating more democratic and more inclusive societies that will provide brighter futures for citizens throughout the Americas.

In 1822 Ecuador gained independence from Spain and joined Gran Colombia — a federation that includes today’s Colombia (plus Panama) and Venezuela — but left in 1830 to become it’s own country.

(In the photo above, Clinton and Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa greet one another with a friendly hug in Quito on June 8.)

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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