Passport

Under Petraeus, Burger King may return to Kandahar

With Gen. Stanley McChrystal safely in retirement and away from the battlefield, U.S. troops can breathe a little easier knowing that their austere — some might say “un-American” — diet may soon be gone along with him. McChrystal, famous for routinely operating on one meal, four hours of sleep and eight-mile runs every day, launched ...

ABDELHAK SENNA/AFP/Getty Images
ABDELHAK SENNA/AFP/Getty Images

With Gen. Stanley McChrystal safely in retirement and away from the battlefield, U.S. troops can breathe a little easier knowing that their austere — some might say “un-American” — diet may soon be gone along with him. McChrystal, famous for routinely operating on one meal, four hours of sleep and eight-mile runs every day, launched a second war — against junk food — this year in an effort to alter base-life culture and make space for vital equipment.

Now, Burger King and other fast-food joints could make a comeback (insert your bad Tolkien joke here) in Kandahar if Gen. David Petraeus approves:

“With respect to Burger Kings, all options are on the table,” he said.

Whew — I’m glad we got that taken care of. What’s next?

With Gen. Stanley McChrystal safely in retirement and away from the battlefield, U.S. troops can breathe a little easier knowing that their austere — some might say “un-American” — diet may soon be gone along with him. McChrystal, famous for routinely operating on one meal, four hours of sleep and eight-mile runs every day, launched a second war — against junk food — this year in an effort to alter base-life culture and make space for vital equipment.

Now, Burger King and other fast-food joints could make a comeback (insert your bad Tolkien joke here) in Kandahar if Gen. David Petraeus approves:

“With respect to Burger Kings, all options are on the table,” he said.

Whew — I’m glad we got that taken care of. What’s next?

Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.
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