Foxconn’s pep rally includes Spiderman costumes, Victorian dresses

In its latest effort to keep employees from leaping from their dorm room balconies, Taiwanese tech manufacturer Foxconn held a pep rally yesterday at its industrial campus in Shenzhen, China. Employees received free T-shirts that read "I <3 Foxconn" and colorful pom-poms to wave in the air. Others got to dress up as superheroes and ...

STR/AFP/Getty Images
STR/AFP/Getty Images
STR/AFP/Getty Images

In its latest effort to keep employees from leaping from their dorm room balconies, Taiwanese tech manufacturer Foxconn held a pep rally yesterday at its industrial campus in Shenzhen, China. Employees received free T-shirts that read "I <3 Foxconn" and colorful pom-poms to wave in the air. Others got to dress up as superheroes and historical characters:

Twenty thousand workers dressed in costumes ranging from cheerleader outfits to Victorian dresses filled the stadium at the factory complex, which was decorated with colorful flags bearing messages such as "Treasure your life, love your family." The workers chanted similar slogans and speakers described their career development at Foxconn. 

Foxconn has been dogged by a wave of suicides this year in the face of low wages and hard working conditions. Already, the company's installed anti-suicide safety nets to catch would-be jumpers and raised wages 30 percent, but judging by its employees' lackluster response to its rah-rah efforts, Foxconn may need to find another way to inspire the troops. Watch.

In its latest effort to keep employees from leaping from their dorm room balconies, Taiwanese tech manufacturer Foxconn held a pep rally yesterday at its industrial campus in Shenzhen, China. Employees received free T-shirts that read "I <3 Foxconn" and colorful pom-poms to wave in the air. Others got to dress up as superheroes and historical characters:

Twenty thousand workers dressed in costumes ranging from cheerleader outfits to Victorian dresses filled the stadium at the factory complex, which was decorated with colorful flags bearing messages such as "Treasure your life, love your family." The workers chanted similar slogans and speakers described their career development at Foxconn. 

Foxconn has been dogged by a wave of suicides this year in the face of low wages and hard working conditions. Already, the company’s installed anti-suicide safety nets to catch would-be jumpers and raised wages 30 percent, but judging by its employees’ lackluster response to its rah-rah efforts, Foxconn may need to find another way to inspire the troops. Watch.

Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.
Tag: China

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