Passport

Iran paper: Carla Bruni is a prostitute

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France’s first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute. Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial ...

DSK/AFP/Getty Images
DSK/AFP/Getty Images

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France's first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute.

Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial titled "French prostitutes join the human rights protest:"

Bruni, the singer and depraved actress who managed to break the Sarkozy family and marry the French president and who is said to have an affair with a singer, has said in S.M's (Sakineh Mohammadi) defence that the verdict is unfair.

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France’s first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute.

Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial titled "French prostitutes join the human rights protest:"

Bruni, the singer and depraved actress who managed to break the Sarkozy family and marry the French president and who is said to have an affair with a singer, has said in S.M’s (Sakineh Mohammadi) defence that the verdict is unfair.

The website of Iran News Network took another route to blast Bruni:

This promiscuous woman of Italian origin, due to her race and actions, is not popular among the French people.

The office of French President Nicolas Sarkozy declined to comment.

Andrew Swift is an editorial researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

The Pentagon is seen from the air over Washington, D.C., on Aug. 25, 2013.

The Pentagon’s Office Culture Is Stuck in 1968

The U.S. national security bureaucracy needs a severe upgrade.

The Azerbaijani army patrols the streets of Shusha on Sept. 25 under a sign that reads: "Dear Shusha, you are free. Dear Shusha, we are back. Dear Shusha, we will resurrect you. Shusha is ours."

From the Ruins of War, a Tourist Resort Emerges

Shusha was the key to the recent war between Azerbaijan and Armenia. Now Baku wants to turn the fabled fortress town into a resort.

Frances Pugh in 2019's Midsommar.

Scandinavia’s Horror Renaissance and the Global Appeal of ‘Fakelore’

“Midsommar” and “The Ritual” are steeped in Scandinavian folklore. Or are they?