Passport

Iran paper: Carla Bruni is a prostitute

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France’s first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute. Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial ...

DSK/AFP/Getty Images
DSK/AFP/Getty Images

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France's first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute.

Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial titled "French prostitutes join the human rights protest:"

Bruni, the singer and depraved actress who managed to break the Sarkozy family and marry the French president and who is said to have an affair with a singer, has said in S.M's (Sakineh Mohammadi) defence that the verdict is unfair.

The Iranian government-run newspaper Kayhan, which is closely tied to the office of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has apparently deemed it wise to call France’s first lady, Carla Bruni, a prostitute.

Bruni has joined the international campaign against the proposed death-by-stoning sentence for Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, which immediately drew a strong reaction in an editorial titled "French prostitutes join the human rights protest:"

Bruni, the singer and depraved actress who managed to break the Sarkozy family and marry the French president and who is said to have an affair with a singer, has said in S.M’s (Sakineh Mohammadi) defence that the verdict is unfair.

The website of Iran News Network took another route to blast Bruni:

This promiscuous woman of Italian origin, due to her race and actions, is not popular among the French people.

The office of French President Nicolas Sarkozy declined to comment.

Andrew Swift is an editorial researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.