Clinton congratulates the people of Libya on their Revolution Day

Today, Sept. 1, is Libya’s Revolution Day, the day on which in 1969 Muammar al-Qaddafi launched a military coup and became leader of the North African country. Normally, that’s not something the U.S. government would be "congratulating," but Secretary Clinton, America’s top diplomat, is reaching out to the people of Libya, stating, "Our governments have ...

Alex Wong/Getty Images
Alex Wong/Getty Images
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Today, Sept. 1, is Libya's Revolution Day, the day on which in 1969 Muammar al-Qaddafi launched a military coup and became leader of the North African country. Normally, that's not something the U.S. government would be "congratulating," but Secretary Clinton, America's top diplomat, is reaching out to the people of Libya, stating, "Our governments have not always agreed on every issue, but our people share the dream of a safer world, a better life, and a brighter future for our children."

Here is her complete statement:

On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Libya as you mark your National Day on September 1.

Today, Sept. 1, is Libya’s Revolution Day, the day on which in 1969 Muammar al-Qaddafi launched a military coup and became leader of the North African country. Normally, that’s not something the U.S. government would be "congratulating," but Secretary Clinton, America’s top diplomat, is reaching out to the people of Libya, stating, "Our governments have not always agreed on every issue, but our people share the dream of a safer world, a better life, and a brighter future for our children."

Here is her complete statement:

On behalf of President Obama and the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Libya as you mark your National Day on September 1.

Our governments have not always agreed on every issue, but our people share the dream of a safer world, a better life, and a brighter future for our children. The United States is committed to working with Libya to achieve these common goals. Although we have only recently reestablished relations between our countries, I hope these new bonds will endure well into the future. We look forward to strengthening the partnership between our governments even as we work through difficult issues, and we seek always to strengthen the friendship between our peoples.

On this occasion, we honor your history and culture, and I offer the people of Libya our warmest wishes for a happy holiday and a peaceful and prosperous year to come. 

(In the photo above, Clinton meets with Libyan National Security Advisor Mutassim Qaddafi, Muammar’s fourth son, in Washington on April 21, 2009.)

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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