Tough talks

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas are meeting at the State Department today, under the watchful gaze of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, to resume direct negotiations between the two sides for the first time in two years. Both leaders, and President Barack Obama, have staked their reputations on the outcome ...

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas are meeting at the State Department today, under the watchful gaze of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, to resume direct negotiations between the two sides for the first time in two years. Both leaders, and President Barack Obama, have staked their reputations on the outcome of the talks. Foreign Policy's Middle East Channel explores the factors that could determine their success -- and the pitfalls that could cause them to collapse.

Contested Settlement, by Hussein Ibish

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas are meeting at the State Department today, under the watchful gaze of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, to resume direct negotiations between the two sides for the first time in two years. Both leaders, and President Barack Obama, have staked their reputations on the outcome of the talks. Foreign Policy‘s Middle East Channel explores the factors that could determine their success — and the pitfalls that could cause them to collapse.

Contested Settlement, by Hussein Ibish

Obama is trying to broker a quiet compromise on the issue of Israeli settlement construction — but it doesn’t seem that the Israeli far right is willing to play ball.

Spoiler Alert, by Amjad Atallah

The United States and Israel have long attempted to cut Hamas out of the diplomatic game. But when it comes to this set of talks, the party appears more than happy to sit on the sidelines.

Off the Table, by Michael Singh

U.S. negotiators can’t just roll up their sleeves and force the Israelis and Palestinians to accept an agreement. But, by affecting the international context under which the negotiations take place, they might just be able to make conditions ripe for a settlement.

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