Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

Those nasty Chinese anti-ship missiles

Naval War College Review does its job and parses out the bubbling issue of the long-range MIRV’d Chinese anti-ship missiles. Here’s the Chinese Communist Party’s take: “China will never abuse its anti-ship missile capacity and launch strikes against foreign carriers without a justified reason.” Feel better now? More on the People’s Liberation Army Navy here.  ...

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Naval War College Review does its job and parses out the bubbling issue of the long-range MIRV'd Chinese anti-ship missiles. Here's the Chinese Communist Party's take: "China will never abuse its anti-ship missile capacity and launch strikes against foreign carriers without a justified reason." Feel better now? More on the People's Liberation Army Navy here

Bottom line: It is time to invest less in manned aircraft for aircraft carriers, and more in stealthy, long-range UCAVs. (For the non-illuminati, that's "unmanned combat aerial vehicles" -- in other words, the wave of the future.) And if you can figure out a way to short sell the current generation of aircraft carriers, you can get rich.   

Naval War College Review does its job and parses out the bubbling issue of the long-range MIRV’d Chinese anti-ship missiles. Here’s the Chinese Communist Party’s take: “China will never abuse its anti-ship missile capacity and launch strikes against foreign carriers without a justified reason.” Feel better now? More on the People’s Liberation Army Navy here

Bottom line: It is time to invest less in manned aircraft for aircraft carriers, and more in stealthy, long-range UCAVs. (For the non-illuminati, that’s “unmanned combat aerial vehicles” — in other words, the wave of the future.) And if you can figure out a way to short sell the current generation of aircraft carriers, you can get rich.   

Meanwhile, the new issue of Parameters, which used to be an interesting magazine, wraps up the Google vs. China situation. Bottom line: The Chinese offensives are great for people looking for nice fat infowar contracts from the Pentagon.

And AEI, the think tank that never saw a war it didn’t like, approves of the Obama administration’s emerging China policy. Hmmm — who thinks that is a good sign?  

Finally, Paul Krugman discusses the clear and present problem China presents. Hint: It is financial, not military.

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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