Happy for released hiker, Clinton urges Iran to free remaining Americans

Secretary Clinton welcomes the news that Iran has released Sarah Shourd — one of the three detained American hikers — but she also urges the country to "extend the same consideration to [other detained U.S. citizens] by resolving their cases without delay and allowing them to immediately return to their families." Below is Clinton’s complete ...

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Secretary Clinton welcomes the news that Iran has released Sarah Shourd -- one of the three detained American hikers -- but she also urges the country to "extend the same consideration to [other detained U.S. citizens] by resolving their cases without delay and allowing them to immediately return to their families."

Below is Clinton's complete statement:

I welcome Sarah Shourd's release from detention in Iran, and am pleased that she will soon be reunited with her family. I appreciate the efforts of all those who have worked for her release, in particular the Swiss Protecting Power in Tehran, the Omani Government, and the many other world leaders who have raised this case and the cases of other detained or missing American citizens. Sarah's fiancé Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal, and other U.S. citizens remain detained or missing in Iran. We urge Iranian authorities to extend the same consideration to them by resolving their cases without delay and allowing them to immediately return to their families.

Secretary Clinton welcomes the news that Iran has released Sarah Shourd — one of the three detained American hikers — but she also urges the country to "extend the same consideration to [other detained U.S. citizens] by resolving their cases without delay and allowing them to immediately return to their families."

Below is Clinton’s complete statement:

I welcome Sarah Shourd’s release from detention in Iran, and am pleased that she will soon be reunited with her family. I appreciate the efforts of all those who have worked for her release, in particular the Swiss Protecting Power in Tehran, the Omani Government, and the many other world leaders who have raised this case and the cases of other detained or missing American citizens. Sarah’s fiancé Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal, and other U.S. citizens remain detained or missing in Iran. We urge Iranian authorities to extend the same consideration to them by resolving their cases without delay and allowing them to immediately return to their families.

(In the photo above, Sarah Shourd gets a visit from her mother, Nora Shourd, in Tehran on May 20.)

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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