Anna Chapman resurfaces at space launch

Everybody’s (or at least the New York Post’s) favorite glamorous Russian spy has resurfaced, putting in an appearance at the launch of a Russian soyuz rocket, bound for the International Space Station: Dressed in a scarlet peacoat, she was spotted in front of the astronauts’ hotel in Baikonur before the lift-off as they boarded a ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
563384_chapman_02.jpg
563384_chapman_02.jpg

Everybody's (or at least the New York Post's) favorite glamorous Russian spy has resurfaced, putting in an appearance at the launch of a Russian soyuz rocket, bound for the International Space Station:

Dressed in a scarlet peacoat, she was spotted in front of the astronauts' hotel in Baikonur before the lift-off as they boarded a bus to go to the launch. She was swiftly led away by a guard after being recognised by journalists....

Since her arrival back in Moscow she has posed in cocktail dresses for a weekly magazine and appeared at a party at a nightclub, but has not given any interviews about her experience.

Everybody’s (or at least the New York Post’s) favorite glamorous Russian spy has resurfaced, putting in an appearance at the launch of a Russian soyuz rocket, bound for the International Space Station:

Dressed in a scarlet peacoat, she was spotted in front of the astronauts’ hotel in Baikonur before the lift-off as they boarded a bus to go to the launch. She was swiftly led away by a guard after being recognised by journalists….

Since her arrival back in Moscow she has posed in cocktail dresses for a weekly magazine and appeared at a party at a nightclub, but has not given any interviews about her experience.

Russian media reports said she has been working as an advisor for a bank that is involved in the Russian space programme but officials at Russia’s space agency Roskosmos were quick to deny it was involved in her visit.

"Roskosmos has nothing to do with Anna Chapman’s visit. As far as we know, she came here as a private individual on the invitation of an executive of a commercial bank," a Roskosmos official said.

Looking forward to where Chapman’s fame will take her. Of course, this could only happen in Russia. No U.S. spy whose cover was blown would ever run around like some kind of reality-show star trading on their newfound celebrity. Oh wait.  

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: Russia

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