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What do Greece, Romania, and Venezuela have in common?

Those are the three unfortunate major economies projected to see negative GDP growth in 2010-2011, according to the IMF’s new World Economic Outlook. (The small Carribean nations of Antigua & Barbuda and St. Kitts & Nevis are also in the red.) Greece, at -3.3 percent, has by far the most dramatic contraction of the bunch. ...

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Those are the three unfortunate major economies projected to see negative GDP growth in 2010-2011, according to the IMF’s new World Economic Outlook. (The small Carribean nations of Antigua & Barbuda and St. Kitts & Nevis are also in the red.) Greece, at -3.3 percent, has by far the most dramatic contraction of the bunch.

The outlook is most grim for Western Europe, much of which will see between 0 and 2 percent growth. Politically unstable Kyrgyzstan seems to be the only Asian country with less than 2 percent growth while similarly unstable Madagascar is Africa’s outlier.

Those are the three unfortunate major economies projected to see negative GDP growth in 2010-2011, according to the IMF’s new World Economic Outlook. (The small Carribean nations of Antigua & Barbuda and St. Kitts & Nevis are also in the red.) Greece, at -3.3 percent, has by far the most dramatic contraction of the bunch.

The outlook is most grim for Western Europe, much of which will see between 0 and 2 percent growth. Politically unstable Kyrgyzstan seems to be the only Asian country with less than 2 percent growth while similarly unstable Madagascar is Africa’s outlier.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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