Aung San Suu Kyi to boycott poll

Despite the fact that she has apparently been given authorization to vote in Burma’s upcoming presidential election, democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she’s not planning on participating:  Her National League for Democracy (NLD) had already decided to disband to avoid having to expel Ms Suu Kyi and other detainees under strict electoral laws. ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
Soe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images

Despite the fact that she has apparently been given authorization to vote in Burma's upcoming presidential election, democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she's not planning on participating

Her National League for Democracy (NLD) had already decided to disband to avoid having to expel Ms Suu Kyi and other detainees under strict electoral laws.

Our South East Asia correspondent Rachel Harvey says her decision not to vote may further encourage other NLD supporters to follow her lead, come election day.

Despite the fact that she has apparently been given authorization to vote in Burma’s upcoming presidential election, democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she’s not planning on participating

Her National League for Democracy (NLD) had already decided to disband to avoid having to expel Ms Suu Kyi and other detainees under strict electoral laws.

Our South East Asia correspondent Rachel Harvey says her decision not to vote may further encourage other NLD supporters to follow her lead, come election day.

That in turn will infuriate the current military leadership, she says.

"The NLD will not compete so she (Suu Kyi) said she has no party to vote for even if she is allowed to vote. As the NLD is not participating in the election, she will not vote," said Nyan Win.

Burma’s upcoming election and the sort-of-but-not really transition to civilian rule appear to be a sham so blatant that one wonders why they’re even going ahead with it. The poll certainly won’t do much for the regime’s international legitimacy. Is anyone in Burma buying it?

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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