World’s tallest building still 90 percent unoccupied

Looking for a pied-a-terre on the Persian Gulf? The owners of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, are getting desperate:  Rents for luxury apartments in Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest tower, have been slashed by as much as 40 percent after the owners failed to find tenants, according to a broker ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images

Looking for a pied-a-terre on the Persian Gulf? The owners of Dubai's Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, are getting desperate

Rents for luxury apartments in Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest tower, have been slashed by as much as 40 percent after the owners failed to find tenants, according to a broker that’s marketing the homes.

The cost of renting a studio with floor-to-ceiling windows, marble and wooden floors has dropped to 6,666 dirhams ($1,815) a month, while a one-bedroom apartment is available for 10,000 dirhams, Better Homes said. Two-bedroom homes are going for 15,833 dirhams.

Looking for a pied-a-terre on the Persian Gulf? The owners of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, are getting desperate

Rents for luxury apartments in Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest tower, have been slashed by as much as 40 percent after the owners failed to find tenants, according to a broker that’s marketing the homes.

The cost of renting a studio with floor-to-ceiling windows, marble and wooden floors has dropped to 6,666 dirhams ($1,815) a month, while a one-bedroom apartment is available for 10,000 dirhams, Better Homes said. Two-bedroom homes are going for 15,833 dirhams.

Nine months after Burj Khalifa was inaugurated with a water-and-firework display, about 825 of the tower’s 900 apartments remain unoccupied, said Laura Adams, a residential sales and leasing adviser at Dubai-based Better Homes.

Any takers? Some adventerous Passport reader out there must want to live 2,000 feet in the air with no neighbors.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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