Hillary Clinton to be in next issue of ‘Foreign Affairs’

Describing Secretary Clinton as among a group of “luminaries,” Foreign Affairs* announced today that America’s top diplomat is a contributor to its next issue — a special issue called “The World Ahead” on “trends and challenges that will shape the future and how the … global role of the United States will be transformed.” Here ...

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Describing Secretary Clinton as among a group of "luminaries," Foreign Affairs* announced today that America's top diplomat is a contributor to its next issue -- a special issue called "The World Ahead" on "trends and challenges that will shape the future and how the … global role of the United States will be transformed."

Here is a blurb from the news release (the bold is in the original):

Foreign Affairs latest issue looks, through the eyes of such luminaries as Hillary Clinton, Eric Schmidt, Richard Haass, and Roger Altman, at the trends and challenges that will shape the future and how the how the [sic] global role of the United States will be transformed.  The issue's contributors reach some startling conclusions about a range of trends, including the widening chasm between China and the United States, the "fertility implosion" that will produce shortages of working-age populations in half the world, and the growing obstacles to cooperative approaches to solving global problems, such as climate change.   

Describing Secretary Clinton as among a group of “luminaries,” Foreign Affairs* announced today that America’s top diplomat is a contributor to its next issue — a special issue called “The World Ahead” on “trends and challenges that will shape the future and how the … global role of the United States will be transformed.”

Here is a blurb from the news release (the bold is in the original):

Foreign Affairs latest issue looks, through the eyes of such luminaries as Hillary Clinton, Eric Schmidt, Richard Haass, and Roger Altman, at the trends and challenges that will shape the future and how the how the [sic] global role of the United States will be transformed.  The issue’s contributors reach some startling conclusions about a range of trends, including the widening chasm between China and the United States, the “fertility implosion” that will produce shortages of working-age populations in half the world, and the growing obstacles to cooperative approaches to solving global problems, such as climate change.   

David Kellogg, the publisher, stated in the news release: “This special issue of Foreign Affairs has already raised the bar for the magazine – it is the first single-themed and largest issue ever produced. The cover has added a gatefold and dramatic cover graphics.”

This special issue hits newsstands Nov. 2, so check it out if you want to read about Clinton’s views on the next decade’s most important trends.

*No, Foreign Affairs is not the same thing as Foreign Policy.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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