Daniel W. Drezner

Gone presentin’

For the rest of this week your humble blogger will be on the 2010 leg of his Zombie Talk Tour in support of the forthcoming book.  Talks are scheduled at UC-Irvine and ZomBcon.  That’s right, ZomBcon.   Blogging will be light for the next few days.  Here’s a topic for discussion, however.  Apparently, the New York Times’ ...

For the rest of this week your humble blogger will be on the 2010 leg of his Zombie Talk Tour in support of the forthcoming book.  Talks are scheduled at UC-Irvine and ZomBcon.  That's right, ZomBcon.  

Blogging will be light for the next few days.  Here's a topic for discussion, however.  Apparently, the New York Times' standard operating procedure is to recycle the same story every week about how the U.S. is now lining up allies in the Pacific Rim to ward off a rising China.  The Financial Times is reporting on how the United States is encouraging India to step up inthe region.  Stronger bilateral ties with China's enduring rivals (Japan, Vietnam, India) are simply an ad hoc response to China's recent strategic missteps, however.  Chinese intentions are unclear, and if you read western pundits, there are an array of contradictory recommendations about how to suss them out. 

Question to readers:  if you had to engineer the U.S. strategy in the Pacific Rim, what would you do to deal with a rising China?  In your answer, be sure to acknowledge the risks and costs, as well as the benefits of your strategy. 

For the rest of this week your humble blogger will be on the 2010 leg of his Zombie Talk Tour in support of the forthcoming book.  Talks are scheduled at UC-Irvine and ZomBcon.  That’s right, ZomBcon.  

Blogging will be light for the next few days.  Here’s a topic for discussion, however.  Apparently, the New York Times’ standard operating procedure is to recycle the same story every week about how the U.S. is now lining up allies in the Pacific Rim to ward off a rising China.  The Financial Times is reporting on how the United States is encouraging India to step up inthe region.  Stronger bilateral ties with China’s enduring rivals (Japan, Vietnam, India) are simply an ad hoc response to China’s recent strategic missteps, however.  Chinese intentions are unclear, and if you read western pundits, there are an array of contradictory recommendations about how to suss them out. 

Question to readers:  if you had to engineer the U.S. strategy in the Pacific Rim, what would you do to deal with a rising China?  In your answer, be sure to acknowledge the risks and costs, as well as the benefits of your strategy. 

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at Tufts University’s Fletcher School. He blogged regularly for Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2014. Twitter: @dandrezner

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.