Attitude Correction

Writing for Foreign Policy’s Middle East Channel, Jonathan Guyer recently panned “P@lestinian Pulse: What Policymakers Can Learn from Palestinian Social Media,” a study I co-authored with Mark Dubowitz of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. Guyer’s review is wrong on several critical points, and necessitates corrections. Dubowitz and I undertook our study to explore ...

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Writing for Foreign Policy's Middle East Channel, Jonathan Guyer recently panned "P@lestinian Pulse: What Policymakers Can Learn from Palestinian Social Media," a study I co-authored with Mark Dubowitz of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. Guyer's review is wrong on several critical points, and necessitates corrections.

Dubowitz and I undertook our study to explore the relatively new realm of Palestinian social media. Our study found that, in their discussions online, Palestinians are generally opposed to diplomacy with Israel. We also found that the Fatah faction, the most prominent party representing the Palestinians in U.S.-led peace talks, is divided somewhat evenly over the utility of violence against Israel. We also found that Hamas supporters online do not waver in their jihadist view of violence against Israel. Indeed, they appear to be in sync with a growing contingent of Salafists on this point.

Writing for Foreign Policy’s Middle East Channel, Jonathan Guyer recently panned “P@lestinian Pulse: What Policymakers Can Learn from Palestinian Social Media,” a study I co-authored with Mark Dubowitz of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. Guyer’s review is wrong on several critical points, and necessitates corrections.

Dubowitz and I undertook our study to explore the relatively new realm of Palestinian social media. Our study found that, in their discussions online, Palestinians are generally opposed to diplomacy with Israel. We also found that the Fatah faction, the most prominent party representing the Palestinians in U.S.-led peace talks, is divided somewhat evenly over the utility of violence against Israel. We also found that Hamas supporters online do not waver in their jihadist view of violence against Israel. Indeed, they appear to be in sync with a growing contingent of Salafists on this point.

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Jonathan Schanzer is the senior vice president for research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Twitter: @JSchanzer

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