The Israel Project rules the airwaves

If you watched the midterm election results come in — and if you’re reading Passport, there’s a  good chance you did — you likely saw this commercial from The Israel Project. And according to the organization’s president, you’re going to keep seeing the ad for some time. The commercial, which was arguably the most prominent ...

MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images
MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images
MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images

If you watched the midterm election results come in -- and if you're reading Passport, there's a  good chance you did -- you likely saw this commercial from The Israel Project. And according to the organization's president, you're going to keep seeing the ad for some time.

The commercial, which was arguably the most prominent instance of a foreign policy issue rearing its head on election night, features remarks from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair interspersed with pictures of smiling children. Both Blair and Netanyahu are quoted lauding the Israel's democracy and affirming its desire to forge an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement.

Another ad urged Israel and the United States to work together on developing alternative energy sources, "so that some day, every neighborhood will be free from our dependence on Middle East oil."

If you watched the midterm election results come in — and if you’re reading Passport, there’s a  good chance you did — you likely saw this commercial from The Israel Project. And according to the organization’s president, you’re going to keep seeing the ad for some time.

The commercial, which was arguably the most prominent instance of a foreign policy issue rearing its head on election night, features remarks from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair interspersed with pictures of smiling children. Both Blair and Netanyahu are quoted lauding the Israel’s democracy and affirming its desire to forge an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement.

Another ad urged Israel and the United States to work together on developing alternative energy sources, "so that some day, every neighborhood will be free from our dependence on Middle East oil."

Jennifer Mizrahi, the Israel Project’s president, said that the ads started airing during the night fo the midterm elections, and will continue to appear for sometime. The organization bought air time on CNN, Fox, MSNBC, and Comedy Central, among other networks.

"We bought a lot of ads," said Mizrahi. "I don’t know, but I think we were on every break. And we should still be on — it’s a very heavy rotation."

Mizrahi estimated the cost of producing the ads at $50,000. She said that her organization had spent "hundreds of thousands of dollars" on ad time over the past year.

Mizrahi said that the Israel Project decided to buy ads at this time because they knew that they would reach a demographic concerned about national security issues. And she wanted to ensure that, though the election may have hinged on domestic economic issues, the next session of Congress doesn’t neglect the U.S. alliance with Israel.

"[W]e want people in Washington to understand that the holding of the peace process is very important to Israel and to people who care about Israel — that we want these peace talks to move forward," said Mizrahi. "That was the first thing: to show the Israeli prime minister’s commitment to a peace process and a two state solution, and a better future for all."

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.