Send us your jokes!

In the next issue of FP, we’re publishing a group of articles on political humor around the world, ranging from funny-ha-ha to self-protective sarcasm to subtly subversive irony. Not surprisingly, this has been a lot of fun to work on, and we wanted to invite you, our readers, to join in. We’re inviting you to ...

GERARD FOUET/AFP/Getty Images
GERARD FOUET/AFP/Getty Images
GERARD FOUET/AFP/Getty Images

In the next issue of FP, we're publishing a group of articles on political humor around the world, ranging from funny-ha-ha to self-protective sarcasm to subtly subversive irony. Not surprisingly, this has been a lot of fun to work on, and we wanted to invite you, our readers, to join in. We're inviting you to send us your political jokes from around the world. Submit in the comments section, and we'll publish our favorites when we post the rest of the stories. To kick things off, here's a classic from Communist Romania:

The Americans sent a CIA agent to Romania to shoot the dangerous dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The agent arrives in the country, finds the dictator addressing a large crowd, picks up his sniper rifle… and can't shoot. He raises it again… and can't shoot. A final time, he lifts the gun, but he just can't do it. When he returns home to report to his supervisor about the failure of his mission, the chief asks what happened. "Well," the agent said. "Each time, it started out great: I had a clean shot, I was ready to go -- and then the crowd saw what I was about to do and started chanting: Shoot him, shoot him, shoot him!"

In the next issue of FP, we’re publishing a group of articles on political humor around the world, ranging from funny-ha-ha to self-protective sarcasm to subtly subversive irony. Not surprisingly, this has been a lot of fun to work on, and we wanted to invite you, our readers, to join in. We’re inviting you to send us your political jokes from around the world. Submit in the comments section, and we’ll publish our favorites when we post the rest of the stories. To kick things off, here’s a classic from Communist Romania:

The Americans sent a CIA agent to Romania to shoot the dangerous dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The agent arrives in the country, finds the dictator addressing a large crowd, picks up his sniper rifle… and can’t shoot. He raises it again… and can’t shoot. A final time, he lifts the gun, but he just can’t do it. When he returns home to report to his supervisor about the failure of his mission, the chief asks what happened. "Well," the agent said. "Each time, it started out great: I had a clean shot, I was ready to go — and then the crowd saw what I was about to do and started chanting: Shoot him, shoot him, shoot him!"

Britt Peterson is a contributing editor and columnist for Washingtonian magazine, as well as a freelancer for the New York Times Book Review, Slate, and Elle. Previously, she was an editor at Foreign Policy, where she oversaw the magazine’s culture section. Twitter: @brittkpeterson

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