Only one Chinese activist RSVPs for Nobel Prize ceremony

Of the 140 Chinese activists and dissidents invited by Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo to attend next month’s cerermony in Oslo, it appears that only one is planning to attend, and he’s not even in China: Wan Yanhai, who fled to the United States in May after increasing official harassment of his AIDS advocacy ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
FREDERIC BROWN/AFP/Getty Images
FREDERIC BROWN/AFP/Getty Images
FREDERIC BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Of the 140 Chinese activists and dissidents invited by Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo to attend next month's cerermony in Oslo, it appears that only one is planning to attend, and he's not even in China:

Wan Yanhai, who fled to the United States in May after increasing official harassment of his AIDS advocacy group, is the only person on that list to confirm his attendance.

"I heard many people on the list were put on a blacklist and were not allowed, or their family members not even allowed, to leave China. It's a horrible situation," Yanhai told AP by phone from Philadelphia, where he lives.

Of the 140 Chinese activists and dissidents invited by Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo to attend next month’s cerermony in Oslo, it appears that only one is planning to attend, and he’s not even in China:

Wan Yanhai, who fled to the United States in May after increasing official harassment of his AIDS advocacy group, is the only person on that list to confirm his attendance.

"I heard many people on the list were put on a blacklist and were not allowed, or their family members not even allowed, to leave China. It’s a horrible situation," Yanhai told AP by phone from Philadelphia, where he lives.

"It could be like I become the only person from that list who will be there," Wan said. "That will be interesting."

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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