Clinton mourns ‘passionate advocate,’ Elizabeth Edwards

Secretary Clinton today expressed her sadness over the death of Elizabeth Edwards, a health-care advocate who supported her politician husband John Edwards in two attempts at the U.S. presidency. In a statement alluding to Edwards’s death after a multiyear battle with cancer, Clinton described her as "a passionate advocate for building a more humane and ...

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Clinton today expressed her sadness over the death of Elizabeth Edwards, a health-care advocate who supported her politician husband John Edwards in two attempts at the U.S. presidency. In a statement alluding to Edwards's death after a multiyear battle with cancer, Clinton described her as "a passionate advocate for building a more humane and just society, for reforming our health care system, and for finding a cure for cancer once and for all." Clinton also stated, "She made her mark on America, and she will not be forgotten."

The complete statement is below:

I am deeply saddened by the passing of Elizabeth Edwards. America has lost a passionate advocate for building a more humane and just society, for reforming our health care system, and for finding a cure for cancer once and for all. But the Edwards family and her legion of friends have lost so much more -- a loving mother, constant guardian, and wise counselor. Our thoughts are with the Edwards family at this time, and with all those people across the country who met Elizabeth over the years and found an instant friend--someone who shared their experiences and offered empathy, understanding and hope. She made her mark on America, and she will not be forgotten.

Secretary Clinton today expressed her sadness over the death of Elizabeth Edwards, a health-care advocate who supported her politician husband John Edwards in two attempts at the U.S. presidency. In a statement alluding to Edwards’s death after a multiyear battle with cancer, Clinton described her as "a passionate advocate for building a more humane and just society, for reforming our health care system, and for finding a cure for cancer once and for all." Clinton also stated, "She made her mark on America, and she will not be forgotten."

The complete statement is below:

I am deeply saddened by the passing of Elizabeth Edwards. America has lost a passionate advocate for building a more humane and just society, for reforming our health care system, and for finding a cure for cancer once and for all. But the Edwards family and her legion of friends have lost so much more — a loving mother, constant guardian, and wise counselor. Our thoughts are with the Edwards family at this time, and with all those people across the country who met Elizabeth over the years and found an instant friend–someone who shared their experiences and offered empathy, understanding and hope. She made her mark on America, and she will not be forgotten.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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