Editor's Note

Introducing Wide Angle: FP’s New iPhone App

Photo essays to go.

560870_101208_iTunesArtwork2.jpg

Odds are you bought your iPhone to bring the world to your fingertips, but has it actually done that? Are you using it to visit Russian coal mines, or are you just looking for the nearest pizza place? Are you checking out Chinese fashion shows, or your sister's Facebook page?

Foreign Policy can help. Our new FP Wide Angle iPhone app brings the popular photo essays from our award-winning website to your phone. (You can download from iTunes here.) We believe the world is not a boring place, and for half a decade we've proved it with online slideshows collecting the newsiest, weirdest, and most visually stunning images from all over the globe: From the battlefields of Kandahar to the streets of Raúl Castro's Cuba, from the fashion stylings of the world's dictators to the crude business of oil.

With FP Wide Angle you'll be able to get our personal favorites from among these guided tours of the world's most interesting corners -- the perfect thing for wiling away a few minutes at the airport gate, transporting yourself during your commute (as long as you're not driving!), or staying awake through a dull U.N. General Assembly meeting (that means you, Ban Ki-moon). You can explore melting glaciers and get a dogs-eye view of China, delight in the dark side of cricket, and run away with Islamabad's circus. And you can do it without spending a cent -- the app, like our online offerings, is free (though we hope you'll still subscribe to our print edition).

Odds are you bought your iPhone to bring the world to your fingertips, but has it actually done that? Are you using it to visit Russian coal mines, or are you just looking for the nearest pizza place? Are you checking out Chinese fashion shows, or your sister’s Facebook page?

Foreign Policy can help. Our new FP Wide Angle iPhone app brings the popular photo essays from our award-winning website to your phone. (You can download from iTunes here.) We believe the world is not a boring place, and for half a decade we’ve proved it with online slideshows collecting the newsiest, weirdest, and most visually stunning images from all over the globe: From the battlefields of Kandahar to the streets of Raúl Castro’s Cuba, from the fashion stylings of the world’s dictators to the crude business of oil.

With FP Wide Angle you’ll be able to get our personal favorites from among these guided tours of the world’s most interesting corners — the perfect thing for wiling away a few minutes at the airport gate, transporting yourself during your commute (as long as you’re not driving!), or staying awake through a dull U.N. General Assembly meeting (that means you, Ban Ki-moon). You can explore melting glaciers and get a dogs-eye view of China, delight in the dark side of cricket, and run away with Islamabad’s circus. And you can do it without spending a cent — the app, like our online offerings, is free (though we hope you’ll still subscribe to our print edition).

In return, we hope you’ll help us out with a couple of things: Give us your feedback on what works and what doesn’t, and rate the app at the iTunes apps store.

You can download FP Wide Angle from iTunes here.

Charles Homans is a special correspondent for the New Republic and the former features editor of Foreign Policy.

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