WikiLeaked

Greed is global

The president of Sudan, Omar al Bashir, may have stashed as much as $9 billion abroad in British banks, claims a cable from the latest batch of WikiLeaks releases in the Guardian Friday. And if he were exposed for such blockbuster corruption, International Criminal Court Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo told U.S. officials, according to the cable, ...

ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images
ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images

The president of Sudan, Omar al Bashir, may have stashed as much as $9 billion abroad in British banks, claims a cable from the latest batch of WikiLeaks releases in the Guardian Friday. And if he were exposed for such blockbuster corruption, International Criminal Court Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo told U.S. officials, according to the cable, public opinion in Sudan may at last call for his arrest. 

We’ll follow up with more details when the cable itself is released on WikiLeaks’ site. But what’s clear from the cables so far is that it’s a dirty world. From the diamond mines of Zimbabwe to the government coffers of Pakistan, U.S. diplomats run into corruption everywhere they go.

We slogged through the muck and grime of the WikiLeaked cables to find the most egregious reports of official thievery. Read on here …

The president of Sudan, Omar al Bashir, may have stashed as much as $9 billion abroad in British banks, claims a cable from the latest batch of WikiLeaks releases in the Guardian Friday. And if he were exposed for such blockbuster corruption, International Criminal Court Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo told U.S. officials, according to the cable, public opinion in Sudan may at last call for his arrest. 

We’ll follow up with more details when the cable itself is released on WikiLeaks’ site. But what’s clear from the cables so far is that it’s a dirty world. From the diamond mines of Zimbabwe to the government coffers of Pakistan, U.S. diplomats run into corruption everywhere they go.

We slogged through the muck and grime of the WikiLeaked cables to find the most egregious reports of official thievery. Read on here …

Elizabeth Dickinson is a Gulf-based member of the journalism collective Deca.

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