Moving on

It’s been an exciting year blogging about Secretary Clinton. In this busy year, she promoted Internet freedom, faced rumors that she’ll replace either Joe Biden or Robert Gates, became a mother-in-law, launched Mideast peace talks, declared a new "American moment," alerted the world to the transformational power of clean cookstoves, was ranked as FP‘s No. ...

KHAM/AFP/Getty Images
KHAM/AFP/Getty Images
KHAM/AFP/Getty Images

It's been an exciting year blogging about Secretary Clinton. In this busy year, she promoted Internet freedom, faced rumors that she'll replace either Joe Biden or Robert Gates, became a mother-in-law, launched Mideast peace talks, declared a new "American moment," alerted the world to the transformational power of clean cookstoves, was ranked as FP's No. 13 Global Thinker, suffered the loss of special envoy Richard Holbrooke, and ended the year with Senate approval of the New START treaty.

Nearly two years into Clinton's post as America's top diplomat, we've decided that this blog has run its course, and now I'll be concentrating my efforts on other editorial tasks here at FP, though I'll still tweet and write occasional posts for Passport. Thanks to everyone who visited this blog. To continue following the twists and turns of Clinton's tenure as secretary of state, I recommend the following sites:

The Cable, by FP's Josh Rogin, who reports on the State Department Laura Rozen over at Politico Still4Hill stacyx's Hillary Clinton blog

It’s been an exciting year blogging about Secretary Clinton. In this busy year, she promoted Internet freedom, faced rumors that she’ll replace either Joe Biden or Robert Gates, became a mother-in-law, launched Mideast peace talks, declared a new "American moment," alerted the world to the transformational power of clean cookstoves, was ranked as FP‘s No. 13 Global Thinker, suffered the loss of special envoy Richard Holbrooke, and ended the year with Senate approval of the New START treaty.

Nearly two years into Clinton’s post as America’s top diplomat, we’ve decided that this blog has run its course, and now I’ll be concentrating my efforts on other editorial tasks here at FP, though I’ll still tweet and write occasional posts for Passport. Thanks to everyone who visited this blog. To continue following the twists and turns of Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state, I recommend the following sites:

Have a happy end of 2010, everyone, and let’s hope for the best, diplomacy-wise for Clinton, in 2011!

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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