The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Do you want to intern for The Cable?

That’s right, The Cable is looking for an enterprising undergrad or graduate student to work part time doing research and writing on the inner workings of foreign policy making inside the Obama administration. One lucky selectee will be chosen for the chance to put in 15 to 20 hours each week gathering content for the ...

That's right, The Cable is looking for an enterprising undergrad or graduate student to work part time doing research and writing on the inner workings of foreign policy making inside the Obama administration.

That’s right, The Cable is looking for an enterprising undergrad or graduate student to work part time doing research and writing on the inner workings of foreign policy making inside the Obama administration.

One lucky selectee will be chosen for the chance to put in 15 to 20 hours each week gathering content for the news, analysis, and interviews that make up the blog. The position is unpaid, but there will be opportunities to cover events, write posts, and spend time hanging out with your humble Cable guy in and around Washington, DC. The Cable‘s new intern will also be a full-fledged member of the Foreign Policy magazine internship program and could be eligible to receive college credit.

The ideal candidate will be Washington based, have a voracious appetite for news, some tangible experience working in foreign policy or with the Obama administration, and have a no fear approach to hunting down facts and stalking senior officials as part of The Cable‘s never ending mission to shine light on the politics and personalities that shape foreign policy decision making here in Washington every day.

If you’re interested in applying, send your one-page resume to me at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com. No phone calls or faxes please.

The Cable is an equal opportunity employer. Journalism experience is helpful but not mandatory. Dallas Cowboys fans need not apply.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

More from Foreign Policy

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.

Can Russia Get Used to Being China’s Little Brother?

The power dynamic between Beijing and Moscow has switched dramatically.

Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.
Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.

Xi and Putin Have the Most Consequential Undeclared Alliance in the World

It’s become more important than Washington’s official alliances today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.
Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

It’s a New Great Game. Again.

Across Central Asia, Russia’s brand is tainted by Ukraine, China’s got challenges, and Washington senses another opening.

Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.
Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.

Iraqi Kurdistan’s House of Cards Is Collapsing

The region once seemed a bright spot in the disorder unleashed by U.S. regime change. Today, things look bleak.