The WikiWeek: January 7, 2011

THE CABLES ASIA/PACIFIC U.S. diplomats try to wean Japan off whale meat.   EUROPE/CAUCASUS The State Department crusades in favor of genetically modified crops in Europe. Is Germany plotting a satellite surveillance network? Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Balarus no longer has the money it needs to investigate UFOs.   MIDDLE EAST Israel ...

559493_110107_cretz22.jpg
559493_110107_cretz22.jpg

THE CABLES

ASIA/PACIFIC

THE CABLES

ASIA/PACIFIC

U.S. diplomats try to wean Japan off whale meat.

 

EUROPE/CAUCASUS

The State Department crusades in favor of genetically modified crops in Europe.

Is Germany plotting a satellite surveillance network?

Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Balarus no longer has the money it needs to investigate UFOs.

 

MIDDLE EAST

Israel allegedly charged bribes for access to the Gaza Strip, and tried to drive it to “the brink of economic collapse.”

The U.S. embassy in Baghdad didn’t warn Saddam Hussein about possible military repercussions before he invaded Kuwait in 1990.

An Iranian general slaps Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

 

THE NEWS

The U.S. government continues to look for evidence of collusion between Bradley Manning and Julian Assange, tries to relocate some of the sources named in the WikiLeaks cables, and attempts to review information security.

U.S. Ambassador Gene Cretz (above), author of the “voluptuous blonde” cable, is called back from Libya, and WikiLeaks claims its first State Department casualty.

Assange hopes his forthcoming memoir “will become one of the unifying documents of our generation.”

Rep. Darrell Issa: Why aren’t we prosecuting Julian Assange under laws we don’t have?

Hillary Clinton: WikiLeaks “threatened our efforts to safeguard America’s security and advance prosperity everywhere.”

Ex-New York Times reporter Judith Miller: Julian Assange is a “bad journalist.”

A deep-sea exploration company claims that WikiLeaks implicates the State Department in a fight with the Spanish government over sunken treasure. Nazis are also involved.

OpenLeaks wants to steal WikiLeaks’ lunch.

A WikiLeaks imitator goes dark in Kenya.

 

THE BIG PICTURE

The story of Julian Assange’s rocky relationship with the media and dwindling finances.

Is Julian Assange really as different from the old media as he thinks?

U.S. Ambassador April Glaspie may not have been a diplomatic genius, but she didn’t start the Gulf War.

Robert Mugabe doesn’t need WikiLeaks to be a tyrant.

Columbia Journalism Review discusses how WikiLeaks is transforming journalism.

All together now: WikiLeaks has not released 250,000 cables. It’s released about 2,000.

WikiLeaks’ revives M.I.A.’s flagging career.

Charles Homans is a special correspondent for the New Republic and the former features editor of Foreign Policy.

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