Assange: China is WikiLeaks’ ‘technological enemy’

Britain’s New Statesman has an interview with Julian Assange in its new issue out tomorrow, and the magazine is teasing a few excerpts from it today. While there’s no love lost between the WikiLeaks founder and the U.S. government — which is still trying to figure out how to extradite and charge him — Assange ...

LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images
LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images
LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images

Britain's New Statesman has an interview with Julian Assange in its new issue out tomorrow, and the magazine is teasing a few excerpts from it today. While there's no love lost between the WikiLeaks founder and the U.S. government -- which is still trying to figure out how to extradite and charge him -- Assange says that China, not the United States, is his true "technological enemy":

China has aggressive and sophisticated interception technology that places itself between every reader inside China and every information source outside China. We've been fighting a running battle to make sure we can get information through, and there are now all sorts of ways Chinese readers can get on to our site.

Britain’s New Statesman has an interview with Julian Assange in its new issue out tomorrow, and the magazine is teasing a few excerpts from it today. While there’s no love lost between the WikiLeaks founder and the U.S. government — which is still trying to figure out how to extradite and charge him — Assange says that China, not the United States, is his true “technological enemy”:

China has aggressive and sophisticated interception technology that places itself between every reader inside China and every information source outside China. We’ve been fighting a running battle to make sure we can get information through, and there are now all sorts of ways Chinese readers can get on to our site.

Asked about his relationship with alleged document source Bradley Manning — whose interactions or lack thereof with Assange prior to Manning’s acquisition of the State Department documents is central to the question of whether the U.S. government has a case against the Australian hacker — Assange says that “I’d never heard his name before it was published in the press,” adding that “WikiLeaks technology was designed from the very beginning to make sure that we never knew the identities or names of the people submitting material.”

Assange also claims to have State Department documents concerning the parent company of his media bête noire Fox News, telling the New Statesman‘s John Pilger that “There are 504 US embassy cables on one broadcasting organisation and there are cables on [Rupert] Murdoch and News Corp.”

Charles Homans is a special correspondent for the New Republic and the former features editor of Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

A propaganda poster from the 1960s shows Chinese leader Mao Zedong.
A propaganda poster from the 1960s shows Chinese leader Mao Zedong.

Xi’s Great Leap Backward

Beijing is running out of recipes for its looming jobs crisis—and reviving Mao-era policies.

A textile worker at the Maxport factory in Hanoi on Sept. 21, 2021.
A textile worker at the Maxport factory in Hanoi on Sept. 21, 2021.

Companies Are Fleeing China for Friendlier Shores

“Friendshoring” is the new trend as geopolitics bites.

German children stand atop building rubble in Berlin in 1948.
German children stand atop building rubble in Berlin in 1948.

Why Superpower Crises Are a Good Thing

A new era of tensions will focus minds and break logjams, as Cold War history shows.

Vacationers sit on a beach in Greece.
Vacationers sit on a beach in Greece.

The Mediterranean as We Know It Is Vanishing

From Saint-Tropez to Amalfi, the region’s most attractive tourist destinations are also its most vulnerable.