Chechen terrorist chief promises ‘year of blood and tears’

In a newly released video, Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov promised more terrorist attacks this year, though he stopped short of taking credit for last month’s bombing at Domodedovo Airport: “We will make this the year of blood and tears,” Umarov said in his statement. “I won’t say there are hundreds of us, but some ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
Wikipedia.
Wikipedia.
Wikipedia.

In a newly released video, Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov promised more terrorist attacks this year, though he stopped short of taking credit for last month's bombing at Domodedovo Airport:

“We will make this the year of blood and tears,” Umarov said in his statement. “I won't say there are hundreds of us, but some five to six dozen can be found, and special operations will be carried out monthly and weekly.”

He identified the man on his left as “mujahed Seifullakh,” assigned to carry out an unspecified counterstrike in response to the federal government's actions in the North Caucasus.

In a newly released video, Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov promised more terrorist attacks this year, though he stopped short of taking credit for last month’s bombing at Domodedovo Airport:

“We will make this the year of blood and tears,” Umarov said in his statement. “I won’t say there are hundreds of us, but some five to six dozen can be found, and special operations will be carried out monthly and weekly.”

He identified the man on his left as “mujahed Seifullakh,” assigned to carry out an unspecified counterstrike in response to the federal government’s actions in the North Caucasus.

Umarov did not elaborate and made no reference to the suicide bombing at Domodedovo, which killed 36 and injured about 180 last month, but Novaya Gazeta speculated Saturday that Umarov’s statement could have been recorded ahead of the airport attack and thus referred to that bombing.

Umarov has come a long way since 2005, when he condemned terrorist attacks like the Beslan school hostage-taking, saying, "If we resort to such methods, I do not think any of us will be able to retain his human face."

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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