Now comes the hard part

What’s next for Egypt? Already, the broad outlines of a transition process are beginning to emerge in Cairo. It will include President Hosni Mubarak departing from office — perhaps as early as Thursday, Feb. 10 — and the formation of an interim government that will include opposition participation. There will be revisions to Egypt’s Constitution ...

557663_110210_cairo_picnik2.jpg
557663_110210_cairo_picnik2.jpg

What's next for Egypt? Already, the broad outlines of a transition process are beginning to emerge in Cairo. It will include President Hosni Mubarak departing from office -- perhaps as early as Thursday, Feb. 10 -- and the formation of an interim government that will include opposition participation. There will be revisions to Egypt's Constitution and legal code in order to allow competitive presidential and parliamentary elections probably before the end of the year. But, as of yet, it's still unclear who is steering events.

It appears that three sets of actors will primarily shape the outcome of the reform process. First and foremost, of course, are the protesters. Although the departure of Mubarak is the cornerstone of their cause, they have also called for reducing corruption, expanding civil and political rights, and holding competitive elections. Many have endured great pain and injury to advance these causes. And they are still massed in Tahrir Square as the protests enter their third week. They will likely not return home until they see tangible progress toward their goals.

Read more.

What’s next for Egypt? Already, the broad outlines of a transition process are beginning to emerge in Cairo. It will include President Hosni Mubarak departing from office — perhaps as early as Thursday, Feb. 10 — and the formation of an interim government that will include opposition participation. There will be revisions to Egypt’s Constitution and legal code in order to allow competitive presidential and parliamentary elections probably before the end of the year. But, as of yet, it’s still unclear who is steering events.

It appears that three sets of actors will primarily shape the outcome of the reform process. First and foremost, of course, are the protesters. Although the departure of Mubarak is the cornerstone of their cause, they have also called for reducing corruption, expanding civil and political rights, and holding competitive elections. Many have endured great pain and injury to advance these causes. And they are still massed in Tahrir Square as the protests enter their third week. They will likely not return home until they see tangible progress toward their goals.

Read more.

 

<p> Bruce K. Rutherford, an associate professor of political science at Colgate University, is author of Egypt After Mubarak: Liberalism, Islam, and Democracy in the Arab World. </p>

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