Springtime for the Egyptian Nazi Party

Signs, like the one above, depicting  Hosni Mubarak as Adolf Hitler, were pretty common during the Egyptian uprising, co-existing peacefully with signs depciting him as a pawn of Israel. But a small number of Egyptians have also apparently taken his downfall as an opportunity to emulate the Fuhrer. Al-Masry Al-Youm reports: A group of Egyptians ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
553699_mubarak_62.jpg
553699_mubarak_62.jpg

Signs, like the one above, depicting  Hosni Mubarak as Adolf Hitler, were pretty common during the Egyptian uprising, co-existing peacefully with signs depciting him as a pawn of Israel. But a small number of Egyptians have also apparently taken his downfall as an opportunity to emulate the Fuhrer. Al-Masry Al-Youm reports:

A group of Egyptians have announced their intent to establish a Nazi party with "a contemporary frame of reference," an independent Egyptian news website said on Wednesday.

Al-Badeel, a leftist news portal, quoted founding member Emad Abdel Sattar as saying the party would bring together prominent figures from the Egyptian society. The party’s founding deputy is a former military official. The party believes in vesting all powers in the president after selecting him or her carefully, Abdel Sattar said, adding that preparations are underway to choose the most competent person to represent the party.  The Nazi party operated secretly under former President Hosni Mubarak, whose regime prevented party leaders from carrying out their activities freely.

Signs, like the one above, depicting  Hosni Mubarak as Adolf Hitler, were pretty common during the Egyptian uprising, co-existing peacefully with signs depciting him as a pawn of Israel. But a small number of Egyptians have also apparently taken his downfall as an opportunity to emulate the Fuhrer. Al-Masry Al-Youm reports:

A group of Egyptians have announced their intent to establish a Nazi party with "a contemporary frame of reference," an independent Egyptian news website said on Wednesday.

Al-Badeel, a leftist news portal, quoted founding member Emad Abdel Sattar as saying the party would bring together prominent figures from the Egyptian society. The party’s founding deputy is a former military official.
The party believes in vesting all powers in the president after selecting him or her carefully, Abdel Sattar said, adding that preparations are underway to choose the most competent person to represent the party. 
The Nazi party operated secretly under former President Hosni Mubarak, whose regime prevented party leaders from carrying out their activities freely.

 

I’m always a little confused about the emergence of neo-Nazis in places like Egypt and Mongolia. Did they not read about the whole Aryan race thing? 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: Egypt

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.