More cow jokes, please

We’ve got a fever here at FP, and the only prescription is more cow jokes! Karim Sadjadpour’s hilarious collection of cow jokes that explain the contemporary Middle East is already stirring up quite a buzz in the blogosphere. We’ve received a lot of additional suggestions from our readers. Here are a few of the best: Pakistan ...

Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

We've got a fever here at FP, and the only prescription is more cow jokes! Karim Sadjadpour's hilarious collection of cow jokes that explain the contemporary Middle East is already stirring up quite a buzz in the blogosphere. We've received a lot of additional suggestions from our readers. Here are a few of the best:

Pakistan
You have two cows. You ignore them, build a nuclear weapon, harbor al-Qaeda, and get free milk from America. When you learn that cows are sacred in India, you kill them.

Kuwait
You have two cows that produce the milk of ten cows. Iraq wants your cows. America also wants your cows, but is less obvious about it. Eventually, you still have two cows, but their grazing land is burnt away.

We’ve got a fever here at FP, and the only prescription is more cow jokes! Karim Sadjadpour’s hilarious collection of cow jokes that explain the contemporary Middle East is already stirring up quite a buzz in the blogosphere. We’ve received a lot of additional suggestions from our readers. Here are a few of the best:

Pakistan
You have two cows. You ignore them, build a nuclear weapon, harbor al-Qaeda, and get free milk from America. When you learn that cows are sacred in India, you kill them.

Kuwait
You have two cows that produce the milk of ten cows. Iraq wants your cows. America also wants your cows, but is less obvious about it. Eventually, you still have two cows, but their grazing land is burnt away.

Oman
You have two Ibadi cows. No one has any idea what the hell an Ibadi is.

Of course, no online discussion would be complete without a spirited back-and-forth on the Israel/Palestine conflict. One reader writes…

You have many productive cows (highest yield in the world/cow). Your neighbors resent the fact that you are not muslim and can make lucrative milk products from your tiny patch of desert sand and demand at least half your cows, or they will throw you and your stinking cows into the sea.

Another responds:

Send your cows onto the internet to deflect any criticism of Israel, even on funny articles that are equally critical of all the surrounding states as well. Accuse anyone who is critical of your cows as being anti-semitic.

It continues:

You have two cows, an Israeli and a Palestinian. They always argue over everything and always drag their quarrels into any argument.

Is Hungary part of the Arab Spring? When it comes to cow jokes it is…

You have two cows. So does your neighbor. One of your cows die. You kill one of the neighbor’s cows because he shouldn’t be better off than you.

Aussie politics (via Twitter)…

Gillardism: You have two cows, the government forces you to pay a tax on their farts, and stops you exporting them.

Are we missing any?

Philip Walker is an editorial researcher at Foreign Policy.

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