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Rumsfeld gets stopped by TSA at airport

Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was on the other side of the homeland security policies his administration helped to create today when he was held up and patted down at the airport after setting off the metal detectors on his way to board a flight. “It takes those of us with two titanium hips and ...

551763_110714_11rummy12.jpg
551763_110714_11rummy12.jpg

Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was on the other side of the homeland security policies his administration helped to create today when he was held up and patted down at the airport after setting off the metal detectors on his way to board a flight.

"It takes those of us with two titanium hips and a titanium shoulder a bit longer to get through TSA," Rumsfeld posted on his Twitter feed earlier this afternoon.

He even linked to TMZ, which broke the story and posted the pictures of Rummy getting the full treatment by TSA officials at Chicago's O'Hare Airport. Rumsfeld took it all in good stride and was recognized by several uniformed soldiers passing through the terminal, TMZ reported.

Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was on the other side of the homeland security policies his administration helped to create today when he was held up and patted down at the airport after setting off the metal detectors on his way to board a flight.

“It takes those of us with two titanium hips and a titanium shoulder a bit longer to get through TSA,” Rumsfeld posted on his Twitter feed earlier this afternoon.

He even linked to TMZ, which broke the story and posted the pictures of Rummy getting the full treatment by TSA officials at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport. Rumsfeld took it all in good stride and was recognized by several uniformed soldiers passing through the terminal, TMZ reported.

Rumsfeld was in Chicago to attend a panel and luncheon hosted by the Heritage Foundation and was on the way to Grand Rapids, MI to attend the funeral of Betty Ford, whom he called “one of America’s most beloved first ladies.”

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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