The WikiWeek: August 26, 2011

THE CABLES AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST When Sens. John McCain and Joe Lieberman met Muammar al-Qaddafi in 2009 — and promised to help him get military equipment from the United States. The Obama administration urged McCain and Lieberman not to bring up the Lockerbie bomber at the meeting. (They did anyway.) Qaddafi’s weird inauguration letter to Barack ...

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Getty Images
Getty Images

THE CABLES

AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST

When Sens. John McCain and Joe Lieberman met Muammar al-Qaddafi in 2009 -- and promised to help him get military equipment from the United States.

THE CABLES

AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST

When Sens. John McCain and Joe Lieberman met Muammar al-Qaddafi in 2009 — and promised to help him get military equipment from the United States.

The Obama administration urged McCain and Lieberman not to bring up the Lockerbie bomber at the meeting. (They did anyway.)

Qaddafi’s weird inauguration letter to Barack Obama.

FP contributor Issandr El Amrani’s WikiLeaks debut.

The U.S. Embassy in Manama requested talking points for answering questions about an allegedly tortured Bahraini Guantanamo detainee in 2005.

AMERICAS

Meet the Coast Guard officer who serves as a back-channel emissary to Havana.

ASIA

U.S. diplomats worry that China is dropping the ball on pollution monitoring and nuclear safety.

A U.S. diplomat went undercover as a Korean tourist to visit a Chinese tiger farm.

Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou told U.S. embassy officials in 2009 that People’s Liberation Army activity in the Taiwan Strait could push Taiwan and China toward political talks.

An April Fools Day cable from the U.S. Embassy in Delhi.

THE NEWS

WikiLeaks drops a giant tranche of nearly 100,000 new cables — we’re still working through them — and is reportedly unhappy with the media’s mounting disinterest in its work. (A bit of advice from your humble Wikiblogger: Not releasing thousands of cables during the fall of Tripoli might help.)

WikiLeaks dissident Daniel Domscheit-Berg tells Wired he destroyed thousands of WikiLeaks documents "in order to ensure that the sources are not compromised."

Charles Homans is a special correspondent for the New Republic and the former features editor of Foreign Policy.

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