Deep Dive The Future of Money

Welcome to Deep Dive, a unique monthly policy conversation about the world’s most pressing issues. Each month, we tackle a new subject from the top of the Washington agenda, featuring key players from Capitol Hill and the executive branch, as well as other global decision-makers, as we go deep on the issues shaping Washington’s intersection ...

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549981_110907_DeepDiveBanner9-115.jpg

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Welcome to Deep Dive, a unique monthly policy conversation about the world’s most pressing issues. Each month, we tackle a new subject from the top of the Washington agenda, featuring key players from Capitol Hill and the executive branch, as well as other global decision-makers, as we go deep on the issues shaping Washington's intersection with the world. In this special edition, we take on the future of money, the complex and long-fought currency wars that threaten to reshape the global economy in unprecedented and unpredictable ways -- starting with a definitive briefing on Beijing’s political calculations by Brookings scholar Arthur Kroeber and key insights from the World Bank’s Mansoor Dailami, noted eurosceptic David Marsh, and China economy expert Michael Pettis, among others. The debate couldn’t be more timely, with a European monetary union in crisis, gold prices going through the roof, and politicians in Washington vowing to up the pressure on China’s undervalued currency.

Welcome to Deep Dive, a unique monthly policy conversation about the world’s most pressing issues. Each month, we tackle a new subject from the top of the Washington agenda, featuring key players from Capitol Hill and the executive branch, as well as other global decision-makers, as we go deep on the issues shaping Washington’s intersection with the world. In this special edition, we take on the future of money, the complex and long-fought currency wars that threaten to reshape the global economy in unprecedented and unpredictable ways — starting with a definitive briefing on Beijing’s political calculations by Brookings scholar Arthur Kroeber and key insights from the World Bank’s Mansoor Dailami, noted eurosceptic David Marsh, and China economy expert Michael Pettis, among others. The debate couldn’t be more timely, with a European monetary union in crisis, gold prices going through the roof, and politicians in Washington vowing to up the pressure on China’s undervalued currency.

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  • The Icarus Zone
    By David Marsh

  • The Multilateral Vacuum
    By Phil Levy

  • The Buck Stays Here
    By Daniel W. Drezner

  • The WikiLeaks of Money
    By Joshua E. Keating

  • The Euro and the Scalpel
    By Ed Hugh

  • Dreaming of SDRs
    By David Bosco

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LAST TIME ON DEEP DIVE
The Future of Trade

BRIEFING BOOK
Building the New World Order

ABOUT DEEP DIVE
ABOUT DEEP DIVE

ABOUT DEEP DIVE
A special joint project from Foreign Policy and the Brookings Institution

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