Daily brief: Three suspects detained in Delhi bombing

Attack investigations Police in Indian-administered Kashmir detained three people in a cyber cafe Wednesday after tracing an email claiming responsibility for the deadly Delhi High Court bombing on behalf of the Pakistan- and Bangladesh-based Harakat-ul-Jihad Islami (HuJI) was traced to the cafe (NYT, WSJ, Reuters, Tel, BBC, ET, AP). Indian authorities are investigating HuJI’s claim ...

RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images
RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images
RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images

Attack investigations

Police in Indian-administered Kashmir detained three people in a cyber cafe Wednesday after tracing an email claiming responsibility for the deadly Delhi High Court bombing on behalf of the Pakistan- and Bangladesh-based Harakat-ul-Jihad Islami (HuJI) was traced to the cafe (NYT, WSJ, Reuters, Tel, BBC, ET, AP). Indian authorities are investigating HuJI's claim of responsibility, while the group's potential involvement has raised questions about a possible Pakistani connection to the attack (TIME, WSJ, Tel). The bombing has also been claimed by the Indian Mujahideen militant group (AFP). And a Chinese militant group believed to based in Pakistan, the Turkistan Islamic Party (TIP) took credit Wednesday for a series of recent attacks in Western China (Guardian, AP).

The U.S. Treasury Department has placed sanctions on three al-Qaeda leaders, including Younis al-Mauritani, who was arrested this week by Pakistani authorities in Quetta, as well as Abu Yahya al-Libi and Mustafa Hajji Muhammad Khan, a courier who has helped facilitate the movement of people and money to al-Qaeda in Pakistan (AFP, WSJ, ET). In other news, two French journalists were detained for several hours near the Abbottabad compound where former al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed in May (ET). And an American security officer was turned away from a nuclear research center in Faisalabad Wednesday while reportedly checking security in the city in advance of a visit by U.S. officials (ET).

Attack investigations

Police in Indian-administered Kashmir detained three people in a cyber cafe Wednesday after tracing an email claiming responsibility for the deadly Delhi High Court bombing on behalf of the Pakistan- and Bangladesh-based Harakat-ul-Jihad Islami (HuJI) was traced to the cafe (NYT, WSJ, Reuters, Tel, BBC, ET, AP). Indian authorities are investigating HuJI’s claim of responsibility, while the group’s potential involvement has raised questions about a possible Pakistani connection to the attack (TIME, WSJ, Tel). The bombing has also been claimed by the Indian Mujahideen militant group (AFP). And a Chinese militant group believed to based in Pakistan, the Turkistan Islamic Party (TIP) took credit Wednesday for a series of recent attacks in Western China (Guardian, AP).

The U.S. Treasury Department has placed sanctions on three al-Qaeda leaders, including Younis al-Mauritani, who was arrested this week by Pakistani authorities in Quetta, as well as Abu Yahya al-Libi and Mustafa Hajji Muhammad Khan, a courier who has helped facilitate the movement of people and money to al-Qaeda in Pakistan (AFP, WSJ, ET). In other news, two French journalists were detained for several hours near the Abbottabad compound where former al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed in May (ET). And an American security officer was turned away from a nuclear research center in Faisalabad Wednesday while reportedly checking security in the city in advance of a visit by U.S. officials (ET).

Pakistan’s Supreme Court chief justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry warned Thursday that situations like the unrest in Karachi can end in military coups, while paramilitary Rangers arrested at least 62 people in the city Thursday (ET, Dawn, ET, Dawn). The Sindh provincial government announced Wednesday that the Rangers would be allowed to keep their police powers for now, and that the government would form "Joint Interrogation Teams" for each district in Karachi (ET). And six judges were appointed to Sindh’s anti-terrorism court Wednesday following orders from the Supreme Court (Dawn).

Four stories round out the Pakistan news: Islamabad is reportedly gearing up to recognize the National Transitional Council (NTC) as the official government of Libya (ET). A Pakistani soldier was killed Tuesday during a firefight with Indian forces along the Line of Control that separates the two countries (Dawn). Officials announced Wednesday that militants had destroyed a school in Khyber agency (Dawn). And energy shortages in Pakistan and increasing prices may prompt the government to institute new weekly holidays and early market closures to reduce consumption (Dawn).

Looming anniversary

In a speech in Washington Wednesday, Prince Turki al-Faisal, the onetime Saudi intelligence chief and ambassador to the United States, said that the killing of bin Laden would have been the "perfect moment" for the United States to declare victory and withdraw its troops from Afghanistan (Reuters, Post). Yaroslav Trofimov, meanwhile, reports on the widespread lack of knowledge in Afghanistan about the 9/11 attacks, while Siobhan Gorman analyzes the growing impact of armed drones on how America has waged wars since the attacks (WSJ, WSJ). Reuters, meanwhile, looks at the persistent problems in implementing post-9/11 intelligence reforms (Reuters).

Ray Rivera explains the difficulties in tallying the number and original location of Pashtun recruits into the Afghan National Army (NYT). And the Christian Science Monitor features the second part of a five-part series on the harrowing fighting endured by U.S. forces against insurgents in the isolated Pech Valley in the eastern province of Kunar (CSM).

Military chic

The Post reports on the boom in revenue for the United States military in recent years from licensing agreements on military-themed products, including a Marine Corps cologne, and a U.S. Air Force Christmas stocking (Post). Retailers this year expect to sell $50 million in U.S. Army-branded products, generating $1.2 million in fees for the Army.

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