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Taiwan arms sales decision announced

The Obama administration formally notified Congress and announced details of its decision to sell Taiwan a new $5.8 billion package of arms, which includes an upgrade package to Taiwan’s existing fighter jets — but not the new F-16 jets it had requested. "The recipient is one of the major powers in Asia and the Western ...

ROBIN UTRECHT/AFP/Getty Images
ROBIN UTRECHT/AFP/Getty Images
ROBIN UTRECHT/AFP/Getty Images

The Obama administration formally notified Congress and announced details of its decision to sell Taiwan a new $5.8 billion package of arms, which includes an upgrade package to Taiwan's existing fighter jets -- but not the new F-16 jets it had requested.

"The recipient is one of the major powers in Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region," stated the notification on the website of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency, where foreign military sales are posted. "It is in the U.S. national interest to assist the recipient in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability, which will contribute to an acceptable military balance in the area."

The bulk of the arms package is made up of $5.3 billion worth of retrofits for Taiwan's 145 F-16 A/B jet fighters.

The Obama administration formally notified Congress and announced details of its decision to sell Taiwan a new $5.8 billion package of arms, which includes an upgrade package to Taiwan’s existing fighter jets — but not the new F-16 jets it had requested.

"The recipient is one of the major powers in Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region," stated the notification on the website of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency, where foreign military sales are posted. "It is in the U.S. national interest to assist the recipient in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability, which will contribute to an acceptable military balance in the area."

The bulk of the arms package is made up of $5.3 billion worth of retrofits for Taiwan’s 145 F-16 A/B jet fighters.

"The proposed retrofit improves both the capabilities and the reliability of the recipient’s fleet of F-16A/B aircraft. The improved capability, survivability, and reliability of newly retrofitted F-16A/B aircraft will greatly enhance the recipient’s ability to defend its borders," the notification said. "This proposed sale serves U.S. national, economic, and security interests by supporting the recipient’s continuing efforts to modernize its armed forces and enhance its defensive capability. The proposed sale will help improve the security of the recipient and assist in maintaining political stability, military balance, and economic progress in the region."

The remaining $500 million in the package is for a pilot training program for Taiwanese pilots to learn how to fly F-16s at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona.

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney issued a statement criticizing the administration for not offering Taiwan the 66 new F-16 C/D fighter jets they had requested.

"President Obama’s refusal to sell Taiwan new military jets is yet another example of his weak leadership in foreign policy," Romney’s statement said. "President Obama has ignored Taiwan’s request and caved into the unreasonable demands of China at the cost of well-paying American jobs. This decision raises serious questions about his commitment to our closest partners and to the policies that have sustained American leadership abroad."

The administration had preemptively given its defense of the decision to reporters on Monday, via a senior administration official speaking on background basis to reporters in New York.

"Assuming the decision is to upgrade F-16 A/B, they will provide essentially the same quality as new F-16 C/D aircraft at a far cheaper price. And Taiwan would stand to get 145 A/Bs versus only 66 C/Ds. And we’re obviously prepared to consider further sales in the future," the official said, not wanting to confirm the details before official congressional notification.

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) sponsored a bill with Sen. Robert Menendez (R-NJ) to compel the administration to sell Taiwan new planes, and he is trying to add that bill as an amendment to the Trade Adjustment Assistance bill that is on the Senate floor now.

"Taiwan must have the tools to defend itself against potential Chinese aggression, and this decision not to sell Taiwan new F-16C/Ds represents a failure by the administration to live up to its obligations under the Taiwan Relations Act," said Cornyn.

The F-16 is produced by Lockheed Martin in Cornyn’s home state of Texas.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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