Turtle Bay

Amateur video of the Turkish tussle in Turtle Bay

Ever since news of the Turtle Bay tussle (and this) between U.N. and Turkish security officers leaked out, news reporters have been scouring the diplomatic ranks in search of a video of the brawl, which left one U.N. officer in the hospital with severely bruised ribs. U.N. cameras recording Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s long anticipated ...

By , a senior staff writer at Foreign Policy.

Ever since news of the Turtle Bay tussle (and this) between U.N. and Turkish security officers leaked out, news reporters have been scouring the diplomatic ranks in search of a video of the brawl, which left one U.N. officer in the hospital with severely bruised ribs.

U.N. cameras recording Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s long anticipated speech to the General Assembly, in which he announced plans to pursue U.N. membership as a full-fledged state, showed foreign delegates turning around mid speech to see what the commotion was just beyond the fourth floor galleries.

It took several days, but the New York Post got an amateur video showing more than a dozen U.N. officers involved in some sort of scuffle in a hallway outside the General Assembly chair. It’s pretty hard to tell what’s going on, though.

One hears raised voices, an officer instructing a man in a dark suit to calm down, and perhaps a person or persons on the ground. Everyone is told to stay away from a wall of glass doors. As the ruckus seems to subside, the sound of applause, filtering out of the GA hall, can be heard. In the end, not entirely satisfying. I’m still holding out hope that someone will leak footage from one of the U.N.’s omnipresent security cameras.

Follow me on Twitter @columlynch

Ever since news of the Turtle Bay tussle (and this) between U.N. and Turkish security officers leaked out, news reporters have been scouring the diplomatic ranks in search of a video of the brawl, which left one U.N. officer in the hospital with severely bruised ribs.

U.N. cameras recording Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s long anticipated speech to the General Assembly, in which he announced plans to pursue U.N. membership as a full-fledged state, showed foreign delegates turning around mid speech to see what the commotion was just beyond the fourth floor galleries.

It took several days, but the New York Post got an amateur video showing more than a dozen U.N. officers involved in some sort of scuffle in a hallway outside the General Assembly chair. It’s pretty hard to tell what’s going on, though.

One hears raised voices, an officer instructing a man in a dark suit to calm down, and perhaps a person or persons on the ground. Everyone is told to stay away from a wall of glass doors. As the ruckus seems to subside, the sound of applause, filtering out of the GA hall, can be heard. In the end, not entirely satisfying. I’m still holding out hope that someone will leak footage from one of the U.N.’s omnipresent security cameras.

Follow me on Twitter @columlynch

Colum Lynch is a senior staff writer at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @columlynch

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