The South Asia Channel

10 Years of War – An FP Roundtable

On October 7, 2001, the United States began conducting bombing raids in Afghanistan, eventually unseating the Taliban government and marking the start of America’s longest war. The war has had a profound impact on Afghanistan and South Asia, and it will continue to shape the region long after international forces withdraw. The AfPak Channel asked ...

TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/Getty Images
TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/Getty Images

On October 7, 2001, the United States began conducting bombing raids in Afghanistan, eventually unseating the Taliban government and marking the start of America’s longest war. The war has had a profound impact on Afghanistan and South Asia, and it will continue to shape the region long after international forces withdraw. The AfPak Channel asked a group of 10 experts and practitioners to reflect on the war, and look ahead to the prospects of a post-American Afghanistan and the broader South Asia region. We have also substantially updated our "Ultimate AfPak Reading List" in the hopes that students, soldiers, and statesmen may be better informed about this important part of the world.

—Peter Bergen and Andrew Lebovich

1.   Jason Burke, Lessons from the 9/11 Wars

2.   Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV, The Afghan National Security Forces: A Progress Report

3.   Omar Samad, Afghanistan at a Critical Juncture

4.   Andrew Exum, Struggling to Build Afghan Security

5.   Scott Worden, The Past as Prologue, Without Afghan Political Reforms

6.   Shamila Chaudhary, The Ideological Failings of the Afghan War

7.   Jenna Jordan, Killing al Qaeda?

8.   Shashank Joshi, India’s Strategic Calculus in Afghanistan

9.   C. Christine Fair, Mapping U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Past, Present, and Future

10.  Derek Reveron, Afghanistan and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

On October 7, 2001, the United States began conducting bombing raids in Afghanistan, eventually unseating the Taliban government and marking the start of America’s longest war. The war has had a profound impact on Afghanistan and South Asia, and it will continue to shape the region long after international forces withdraw. The AfPak Channel asked a group of 10 experts and practitioners to reflect on the war, and look ahead to the prospects of a post-American Afghanistan and the broader South Asia region. We have also substantially updated our "Ultimate AfPak Reading List" in the hopes that students, soldiers, and statesmen may be better informed about this important part of the world.

—Peter Bergen and Andrew Lebovich

1.   Jason Burke, Lessons from the 9/11 Wars

2.   Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell, IV, The Afghan National Security Forces: A Progress Report

3.   Omar Samad, Afghanistan at a Critical Juncture

4.   Andrew Exum, Struggling to Build Afghan Security

5.   Scott Worden, The Past as Prologue, Without Afghan Political Reforms

6.   Shamila Chaudhary, The Ideological Failings of the Afghan War

7.   Jenna Jordan, Killing al Qaeda?

8.   Shashank Joshi, India’s Strategic Calculus in Afghanistan

9.   C. Christine Fair, Mapping U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Past, Present, and Future

10.  Derek Reveron, Afghanistan and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

<p> Peter Bergen, a frequent visitor to Afghanistan since 1993, is author of Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad. </p>

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