The not-so-great man theory of history

Has it really come to this? That the fate of Europe’s economy is in the hands of Silvio Berlusconi, whose career in Italian politics is closer to opera bouffe than responsible statesmanship? Whatever you think of the latest effort to save Europe and the Euro — and I’m not that impressed — this does not ...

Walt-Steve-foreign-policy-columnist20
Walt-Steve-foreign-policy-columnist20
Stephen M. Walt
By , a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

Has it really come to this? That the fate of Europe's economy is in the hands of Silvio Berlusconi, whose career in Italian politics is closer to opera bouffe than responsible statesmanship? Whatever you think of the latest effort to save Europe and the Euro -- and I'm not that impressed -- this does not strike me as an encouraging sign. After all, Berlusconi first became Prime Minister in 1994 and he's served three terms since then. Since 1996, Italy has managed a pitiful 0.75 percent average growth rate, and its anemic economic performance is why there are lingering doubts about its ability to pay its debts. But hey: at least the problem is in the hands of someone with a proven track recordof double-dealing, indictments, sex scandals, and personal aggrandizement.

Has it really come to this? That the fate of Europe’s economy is in the hands of Silvio Berlusconi, whose career in Italian politics is closer to opera bouffe than responsible statesmanship? Whatever you think of the latest effort to save Europe and the Euro — and I’m not that impressed — this does not strike me as an encouraging sign. After all, Berlusconi first became Prime Minister in 1994 and he’s served three terms since then. Since 1996, Italy has managed a pitiful 0.75 percent average growth rate, and its anemic economic performance is why there are lingering doubts about its ability to pay its debts. But hey: at least the problem is in the hands of someone with a proven track recordof double-dealing, indictments, sex scandals, and personal aggrandizement.

Stephen M. Walt is a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University. Twitter: @stephenwalt

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.