The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Australian Embassy celebrating Movember with Stash Bash

Have you ever wanted an excuse to grow a moustache? Well now you have two: You can raise money to fight cancer during "Movember" as part of a nation-wide campaign, and you can party with Australian diplomats, who are throwing themselves face first into the effort. This Friday, the Australian Embassy will host a kick-off ...

547746_1aamovember12.jpg
547746_1aamovember12.jpg

Have you ever wanted an excuse to grow a moustache? Well now you have two: You can raise money to fight cancer during "Movember" as part of a nation-wide campaign, and you can party with Australian diplomats, who are throwing themselves face first into the effort.

This Friday, the Australian Embassy will host a kick-off party for Movember called "Embassy Mos on Embassy Row," an event they are calling a "Stash Bash" that will include "Mo Bros and Sistas" from other embassies around Washington.

Have you ever wanted an excuse to grow a moustache? Well now you have two: You can raise money to fight cancer during "Movember" as part of a nation-wide campaign, and you can party with Australian diplomats, who are throwing themselves face first into the effort.

This Friday, the Australian Embassy will host a kick-off party for Movember called "Embassy Mos on Embassy Row," an event they are calling a "Stash Bash" that will include "Mo Bros and Sistas" from other embassies around Washington.

"Since its humble beginnings in Melbourne Australia, Movember has grown to become a truly global movement inspiring more than 1.1 Million Mo Bros and Mo Sistas to participate with formal campaigns in Australia, New Zealand, the U.S., Canada, the UK, Finland, the Netherlands, Spain, South Africa and Ireland," the Australian Embassy said in a press release. "In addition, Movember is aware of Mo Bros and Mo Sistas supporting the campaign and men’s health cause across the globe, from Russia to Dubai, Hong Kong to Antarctica, Rio de Janeiro to Mumbai, and everywhere in between."

All you have to do to participate is to register at http://us.movember.com, stop shaving your moustache today and keep your ‘stache until December rolls around.

"At the end of the month, Mo Bros and Mo Sistas celebrate their gallantry and valor by either throwing their own Movember party or attending one of the infamous Gala Partés held around the world by Movember, for Movember," the Movember website explains.

The funds raised for Movember in the United States support research to find treatments for prostate cancer and other cancers that affect men, and are directed to programs run directly by Movember, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and LIVESTRONG, the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

And yes, your humble Cable guy is an officially registered Mo Bro and you can make a donation to support my effort here. (http://mobro.co/TheCable).

Let the moustache growing begin!

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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