Daniel W. Drezner

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2011 Albies

It’s mid-December, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 2011 Albies, in honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman. To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination: I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the calendar year that made you ...

It's mid-December, which means it's time to start garnering nominations for the 2011 Albies, in honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman.

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I'm talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

It’s mid-December, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 2011 Albies, in honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman.

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

I know that this was a super-boring year for those interested in the global political economy, so it’s going to be tough to find good material.  Still, please try — this is, I believe, the only year-end Top 10 list that neither Time nor The Atlantic has comandeered.  Here’s a link to my 2010 list for reference. 

The winners will be announced on December 31st.  In the meantime, readers are strongly encouraged to submit their nominations (with links if possible) in the comments.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at Tufts University’s Fletcher School. He blogged regularly for Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2014. Twitter: @dandrezner

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.